Classes During The Summer

Winter quarter has just started, but it is never too early to start thinking about your plan for the summer. There are many options; you can work, intern, or just relax on a couch all day! But if the thought of taking classes during the summer has entered your  mind then there are few details to consider. For example,  you may want to consider the difference between taking classes at a community college, another 4 year institution, or UC Davis. In addition, it’s important to know the difference between classes that articulate versus transfer when attending an institution outside of UC Davis. Knowing this information is critical in making the best decision for your academic future, but lucky for you it is all located below.

 Why consider taking classes during the summer?

  • A student can complete additional units towards his or her degree and can help a student graduate within 4 years.
  • A student can use summer school to meet minimum progress. For information on minimum progress visit https://registrar.ucdavis.edu/records/transcripts/academic-standing.cfm
  •  Summer school is a great option for students who have had trouble getting into classes during the academic year.
  • Taking courses during summer can lead to a more balanced work load during the academic year.
  • Students can take courses in order to satisfy their GE requirements or a minor.

Students have the ability to take classes at a community college, at another four year institution, or stay at UC Davis. Below I will summarize how to navigate through these different options and why each of these options may be a good idea for you:

Community Colleges:

  1. Pros:
    • Community college is usually close to home! Many students at UC Davis are far from home and want to head back for their summer vacation. Also living at home could potentially be cheaper in terms of housing.
    • Community college can save you money! UC Davis summer sessions are more pricey than completing courses at a community college. Community college fees are approximately $46 a unit.
    • Most community colleges are on the semester system and have different way of calculating units.  To convert the semester units to quarter units, multiply the semester units by 1.5. For example, 3 units at a community college on the semester system is converted to 4.5 units at UC Davis. This can be a great reason to take courses at a community college because you are given more units which can help towards the GE requirement, graduation, or minimum progress requirements.
  2. Cons:
    • Community colleges do not offer upper division courses and courses taken at the community college will not factor into your UC Davis GPA.
    • Many students want to complete their preparatory work at a community college (MAT, BIS, CHE, PHY), but it is not recommended to break apart series and take them at different schools. This is because classes at a community college might not correlate with Davis’ structure.

Another important concept that most students get confused with is the difference between a class being articulated and a class being transferred. If a class articulates, that means that a class at a community college is equivalent to a class at UC Davis, and the student will get credit for completing the course. On the other hand, if a class is just transferable, then the student will only receive units for having completed the course. To check if classes at your community college can be articulated use assist.org. Assist.org is a great website to see which classes at a community college articulate to another 4 year institution.

Other Four-Year Institutions: Although there is an articulation database (assist.org) that links community colleges directly to 4-year institutions, there is not one that links 4-year institutions with other 4-year institutions. This is important because if a student wanted to go to another UC or a California State University (CSU) , that student would have to be more proactive in finding an articulation for the class he or she is interested in taking. For example, if a student wants to take a psychology course at Cal State Fullerton, he or she would have to bring in the syllabus from Fullerton and take it to the psychology department at UC Davis. The psychology department would then decide if the class at Fullerton can be articulated to a class at UC Davis or if more information is needed.

  • Similar to community colleges, classes at CSU campuses will not be considered in your UC Davis GPA. However, classes from another UC (UCLA for example) will be added into your UC GPA.

Summer Sessions at UC Davis: Taking classes at another UC campus offers additional benefits than a community college or a California State University:

  • Taking summer classes at a UC can help improve your UC cumulative GPA.
  • Repeating courses can only be done at a UC campus if your intention is to replace the initial grade received in the course.
  • Many lower and upper division courses needed for your major, university, and college requirements are offered at UC Davis during the summer.

Extra information for UC Davis  Summer session:

Dates for Summer Sessions 2017:

Summer Session 1: Jun 26 – Aug 4

Summer Session 2: Aug 7 -Sep 15

Special Session: Jun 19-Sep 15

Pass times appointments: Registration begins May 1 st. Please see your schedule builder for your specific Pass time.

If you are receiving financial aid at UC Davis, simply register for classes on your designated appointment time and the financial aid office will distribute financial aid based on the classes registered. I suggest to go to the financial aid office, located on 1st  floor of Dutton hall, to see a financial aid officer to discuss options for financial aid. For more information about classes offered, fees, and other important dates visit  http://summer-sessions.ucdavis.edu/

Brenda Garibay

5th year, Biological Sciences Major

B.A.S.C. Peer Adviser

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