Classes During The Summer

Winter quarter has just started, but it is never too early to start thinking about your plan for the summer. There are many options; you can work, intern, or just relax on a couch all day! But if the thought of taking classes during the summer has entered your  mind then there are few details to consider. For example,  you may want to consider the difference between taking classes at a community college, another 4 year institution, or UC Davis. In addition, it’s important to know the difference between classes that articulate versus transfer when attending an institution outside of UC Davis. Knowing this information is critical in making the best decision for your academic future, but lucky for you it is all located below.

 Why consider taking classes during the summer?

  • A student can complete additional units towards his or her degree and can help a student graduate within 4 years.
  • A student can use summer school to meet minimum progress. For information on minimum progress visit https://registrar.ucdavis.edu/records/transcripts/academic-standing.cfm
  •  Summer school is a great option for students who have had trouble getting into classes during the academic year.
  • Taking courses during summer can lead to a more balanced work load during the academic year.
  • Students can take courses in order to satisfy their GE requirements or a minor.

Students have the ability to take classes at a community college, at another four year institution, or stay at UC Davis. Below I will summarize how to navigate through these different options and why each of these options may be a good idea for you:

Community Colleges:

  1. Pros:
    • Community college is usually close to home! Many students at UC Davis are far from home and want to head back for their summer vacation. Also living at home could potentially be cheaper in terms of housing.
    • Community college can save you money! UC Davis summer sessions are more pricey than completing courses at a community college. Community college fees are approximately $46 a unit.
    • Most community colleges are on the semester system and have different way of calculating units.  To convert the semester units to quarter units, multiply the semester units by 1.5. For example, 3 units at a community college on the semester system is converted to 4.5 units at UC Davis. This can be a great reason to take courses at a community college because you are given more units which can help towards the GE requirement, graduation, or minimum progress requirements.
  2. Cons:
    • Community colleges do not offer upper division courses and courses taken at the community college will not factor into your UC Davis GPA.
    • Many students want to complete their preparatory work at a community college (MAT, BIS, CHE, PHY), but it is not recommended to break apart series and take them at different schools. This is because classes at a community college might not correlate with Davis’ structure.

Another important concept that most students get confused with is the difference between a class being articulated and a class being transferred. If a class articulates, that means that a class at a community college is equivalent to a class at UC Davis, and the student will get credit for completing the course. On the other hand, if a class is just transferable, then the student will only receive units for having completed the course. To check if classes at your community college can be articulated use assist.org. Assist.org is a great website to see which classes at a community college articulate to another 4 year institution.

Other Four-Year Institutions: Although there is an articulation database (assist.org) that links community colleges directly to 4-year institutions, there is not one that links 4-year institutions with other 4-year institutions. This is important because if a student wanted to go to another UC or a California State University (CSU) , that student would have to be more proactive in finding an articulation for the class he or she is interested in taking. For example, if a student wants to take a psychology course at Cal State Fullerton, he or she would have to bring in the syllabus from Fullerton and take it to the psychology department at UC Davis. The psychology department would then decide if the class at Fullerton can be articulated to a class at UC Davis or if more information is needed.

  • Similar to community colleges, classes at CSU campuses will not be considered in your UC Davis GPA. However, classes from another UC (UCLA for example) will be added into your UC GPA.

Summer Sessions at UC Davis: Taking classes at another UC campus offers additional benefits than a community college or a California State University:

  • Taking summer classes at a UC can help improve your UC cumulative GPA.
  • Repeating courses can only be done at a UC campus if your intention is to replace the initial grade received in the course.
  • Many lower and upper division courses needed for your major, university, and college requirements are offered at UC Davis during the summer.

Extra information for UC Davis  Summer session:

Dates for Summer Sessions 2017:

Summer Session 1: Jun 26 – Aug 4

Summer Session 2: Aug 7 -Sep 15

Special Session: Jun 19-Sep 15

Pass times appointments: Registration begins May 1 st. Please see your schedule builder for your specific Pass time.

If you are receiving financial aid at UC Davis, simply register for classes on your designated appointment time and the financial aid office will distribute financial aid based on the classes registered. I suggest to go to the financial aid office, located on 1st  floor of Dutton hall, to see a financial aid officer to discuss options for financial aid. For more information about classes offered, fees, and other important dates visit  http://summer-sessions.ucdavis.edu/

Brenda Garibay

5th year, Biological Sciences Major

B.A.S.C. Peer Adviser

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Different Note-Taking Strategies

Recently, I attended a Noteschool supplies on yellow background-taking strategy workshop hosted by the Student Academic Success Center (SASC). Because I found the information helpful, I wanted to share some of it! The speaker explained some of the most popular note-taking strategies, while also explaining the positive and negatives of each. What I really enjoyed about this workshop was the overall theme, which was that every person learns differently. Therefore, it is important to try out many different styles of note-taking, in order to find the one that works best for you. Let’s now go through some popular strategies.

  • Cornell Notes: Cornell note-takingNotes is a popular note-taking strategy. This strategy has probably been mentioned several times throughout your academic career. The structure of Cornell Notes can be found to the left. Typically these types of notes are hand written during lecture. The paper is sectioned into 3 parts: the left side is for questions and key points, the right side is for the the bulk of the notes, and the bottom portion is for a summary. The advantage of Cornell Notes is that as a student writes their notes in class, they are also making a study guide that can be used for exam preparation. All you have to do is is fold over the left column to test yourself! Also, Cornell Notes offer the option to write a quick summary, which is a great way to review your notes regularly at the enotesoutlinend of the day.
  • Outlines: Another common way to write your notes in class is the typical outline. The advantage of using this note-taking strategy is that as a student writes their notes, they are nicely organized and easily readable for later studying. These notes can be either typed on a laptop or hand written.
  • PowerPoint: The final note taking strategy is using PowerPoint slides that the professor, typically, provides before class. Students can take notes directly on the slides during class either using their computer or writing directly on a printed version. The biggest advantage to using PowerPoint is its ability to allow a student a faster way to take notes. Most of the information is already on the slides provided. Therefore, students have the time to write the extra information the professor says in class.

There are disadvantages to each type of strategy, but those disadvantages depend on the structure of the class. For example, Cornell Notes would be difficult to use in a class that moves quickly and has a lot of detail that the professor expects you to know. Therefore, typing or using the PowerPoint slides might be more beneficial. Of course, it is important to gauge the class and see which style will be the most effective. However, there are some general tips you can use to help you be a more effective note-taker.

  • Writing a summary at the end of your notes is a great way to review. Also, reading that summary frequently allows you to review all the content from that lecture more quickly and aids in retention of the material.
  • Based on a study published in Psychological Science, hand writing has been shown to be more effective in retaining the information the student takes notes of. Students who type their notes tend to write everything the professor says, but students who write their notes have to be more selective on what they chose to write down. Having to be selective makes students think about the content while writing. Computers, also, can lead to distractions during lecture. However, I do understand that some classes are so detailed that a faster way to write your notes is more effective.
  • However, there are ways to combine some of these strategies. For example, you can take handwritten notes during lecture and listen to the podcast after class to fill in the information you may have missed in class. This would allow you to hand-write your notes, but also have all the detail provided by PowerPoint slides.

Writing perfect notes for each class is a tricky thing, but just try to find ones that work best for you. If you want to know more about note-taking, time-management, or other academic resources, check out the Student Academic Success Center’s many workshops at http://success.ucdavis.edu/academic/index.html.

Brenda Garibay
5th year, Biological Science Major, CMN minor
BASC Peer Adviser

New Biological Sciences Major Vs. Old- Which should I do?

As of Fall 2015, the College of Biological Sciences released a new Biological Sciences (BIS) major that has caused some confusion among students. I want to clarify the differences between these two majors, specifically the B.S. degrees, and provide some suggestions to students who are deciding which requirements to follow. The main confusion among students is the fact that some students have to do the new BIS major requirements, while others have the choice of choosing between the two. Remember, you have catalog rights, which means if you started attending UC Davis any time Fall 2015 or later, you need to follow the new BIS major requirements. On the other hand, if you started attending UC Davis before fall 2015, your catalog rights allow you to decide between the two different majors, which can be a bit overwhelming. Below, I will discuss those differences and hopefully help you decide which major requirements to follow. Also, once you decide on which requirements to complete, I suggest sticking to those requirements as you cannot combine the two majors and make your own!

Pre-Fall 2015- “OLD” BIS Major

First, let’s go over the original BIS major. For students who started Fall 2015 or later, ignore this segment and jump to the new BIS major requirements! Like any major in the College of Biolobis-oldgical Sciences, students must complete the 5 major prerequisites series with the addition of STA 100: BIS 2ABC, CHE 2ABC, MAT 17ABC, CHE 118 ABC/CHE 8AB, and PHY 7ABC. This major accepts either BIS 101, 105, & 104 or BIS 101, 102, 103, & 104. The biggest difference between the two majors is the final portion of the requirements. BIS pre-Fall 2015 includes field requirements and an emphasis. To complete the field requirements, students take a class in each of the following areas: Evolution, Ecology, Microbiology, Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, and Plant Biology. Students then choose an area of emphasis, which could include Evolution, Ecology, and Biodiversity, Plant Biology, Marine Biology, Microbiology, Molecular and Cellular Biology, or Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior. Each emphasis has its own unique set of requirements, but typically requires students to complete 13-17 units. The final requirement for this major is that the depth subject matter, which includes STA 100, needs to total to 49 units. This was a quick and easy summary of the degree check list, but feel free to stop by the Biology Academic Success Center or visit basc.ucdavis.edu if you have further questions.

Frequently Asked Questions:

  • Is the emphasis shown on my transcript or diploma?
    • Unfortunately, no. The emphasis is not shown on either a student’s transcript or diploma.
  • Do I need to complete the Field Requirement that matches the area of my emphasis? For example, if I emphasize in NPB, do I still need to do the NPB Field Requirement?
    • This is a common assumption; YES, a student must complete all field requirements and their emphasis.

Fall 2015-“NEW” BIS Major

new-bisHere is a link to the Major degree check list, so you can follow along or look at the picture provided!

As mentioned before, the biggest difference between the degree patterns is the depth subject matter because this major still includes all of the prerequisites as the old BIS major, as well as STA 100, BIS 101, 102 & 103 (or 105), and BIS 104. The new BIS major removes the field requirements and the emphases, but the same idea remains. Instead of listing multiple classes in each area, the new major removes some of the classes in each topic giving a more concrete list of classes to take. The new major also removes the areas of emphasis and terms the new requirement as “restricted electives.” A student must complete 11 units from the approved list found on the BASC website or in the University’s General Catalog. Among these requirements, a student must complete a minimum of 6 hours of lab. Lab work can be completed by taking a class with a six hours lab per week (ex: EXB 106/106L) or taking 2 classes with 3 hours of lab per week (ex: NPB 101L & MIC 103L). Also, this major allows a student to have up to 3 units of approved research electives to be used toward restricted electives. This new major reduces the redundancy and clutter by narrowing the choices for field requirements, but also increases the options for electives allowing students to create their own unique schedule.

For students who are deciding which major requirements to follow, here are some additional considerations:

  1. How far along are you on the old major vs. the new requirements? Would it be a smooth transition?
  2. Can the classes you have already completed for the old major be used to satisfy requirements for the new major?
  3. Are there classes you really want to take that won’t satisfy major requirements for one major but do for the other?

Overall, both majors were made with the idea of providing students with a broad biology education, while at the same time allowing students to choose classes based on their interests. Most of the information shared today can be found on the BASC website! Please stop by the Biology Academic Success Center for further questions!

Best,
Brenda Garibay
5th year, Biological Sciences Major, minor in Communication
BASC Peer Advisor

Minors

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imagesAt UC Davis, minors are extremely popular because of the flexibility and benefits they provide to students. Freshman to senior, you can decide to pursue a minor, generally with plenty of time to complete it. Having a minor to supplement a major has it benefits as well as costs. Below, I breakdown the components of a minor:

What is a minor composed of?

  1. Typically every minor is between 20-24 upper division units, which is about 5-6 classes. Let’s take a look at one of the minors in order to explain the amount of units and classes necessary to complete it:
    • Economics (ECN): According to the Economics Department via the online UC Davis catalog, to complete this minor a student must take the required classes: ECN 100 and ECN 101. Another portion of the minor is to select 8 units worth of classes from a particular list prvided in the catalog. This totals 16 units of the 20 required to complete the minor. Therefore, in order to reach 20 units, students need to select 4 units of any upper division economics course. Although only the minor requirements are listed in the catalog, there are some underlying prerequisites required by most upper division classes. Therefore, minors are typically more then 20 units. For example, ECN 100 requires that students have completed ECN 1A, 1B and MAT 16A, 16B.
  2. Why get a minor? What are the benefits?
    • Minors help balance a student’s schedule. Once a CBS student reaches their third or fourth year, their major courses are only 3-4 units. If a student registers for 3 major classes he or she would only have 9-11 units for the quarter. Therefore, the student will still need at least one more class. Taking three sciences courses is already a significant workload. A minor that is a different subject than a student’s major allows him or her to create a more balanced schedule.
    • Minors can be counted towards GE credit and the 180 units needed to graduate. A lot of minors, but not all, complete a large portion of Topical Breadth in the GE chart. For example, a minor in ECN allows a student to complete units toward the Social Sciences Topical Breadth GE requirement.
  3. What are the costs of pursing a minor?
    • Many classes needed to complete a minor can be major restricted, which means you cannot get the class until Pass 2. This poses a potential risk- because classes can be filled by Pass 2. Hypothetically, a student could only need one more class his or her last quarter to complete a minor, but because of a major restriction he or she may not get into the class. Although this can be an annoying detail, my communication minor is major restricted, but I have been able to register for my courses regularly. Note, not all minors are major restricted.
    • In addition, only one class from a minor can overlap with a student’s major. Therefore, some minors are impossible to complete with certain majors.

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Now that you have been convinced to pursue a minor, you are probably wondering how to declare it for your degree! The process if very simple.

  1. Start taking courses toward your desired minor.
  2. A minor must be declared by the last quarter you plan to graduate. Therefore, a student can work towards the minor even if the minor is not declared.
  3. To declare the minor, a Minor Declaration petition must be submitted through OASIS. A student can see the progress of the minor through Forms and Petitions.

I believe minors are a great opportunity to develop different skills. For example, I enjoy studying the sciences, but I also have a passion for listening and communicating with people. Therefore, I chose to complete a minor in Communication; I enjoy the balance my minor brings to my schedule. My communication classes allow me to learn about another interest of mine, while at the same time giving me credit for my GE requirement and enhancing a new skill. I hope you will consider declaring a minor! The General Catalog lists the variety of minors offered at UC Davis. Check it out !

 

Brenda Garibay

4th year, Biological Sciences Major

B.A.S.C. Peer Adviser

Have you thought about your summer plans?

Summer%20Session%20logocropped-fall.jpg

Winter quarter has just started, but it is never too early to start thinking about your plan for the summer. There are many options; you can work, intern, or just relax on a couch all day! But if the thought of taking classes during the summer has entered your  mind then there are few details to consider. For example,  you may want to consider the difference between taking classes at a community college, another 4 year institution, or UC Davis. In addition, it’s important to know the difference between classes that articulate versus transfer when attending an institution outside of UC Davis. Knowing this information is critical in making the best decision for your academic future, but lucky for you it is all located below.

 Why consider taking classes during the summer?

  • A student can complete additional units towards his or her degree and can help a student graduate within 4 years.
  • A student can use summer school to meet minimum progress. For information on minimum progress visit https://registrar.ucdavis.edu/records/transcripts/academic-standing.cfm
  •  Summer school is a great option for students who have had trouble getting into classes during the academic year.
  • Taking courses during summer can lead to a more balanced work load during the academic year.
  • Students can take courses in order to satisfy their GE requirements or a minor.

Students have the ability to take classes at a community college, at another four year institution, or stay at UC Davis. Below I will summarize how to navigate through these different options and why each of these options may be a good idea for you:

Community Colleges:

  1. Pros:
    • Community college is usually close to home! Many students at UC Davis are far from home and want to head back for their summer vacation. Also living at home could potentially be cheaper in terms of housing.
    • Community college can save you money! UC Davis summer sessions are more pricey than completing courses at a community college. Community college fees are approximately $46 a unit.
    • Most community colleges are on the semester system and have different way of calculating units.  To convert the semester units to quarter units, multiply the semester units by 1.5. For example, 3 units at a community college on the semester system is converted to 4.5 units at UC Davis. This can be a great reason to take courses at a community college because you are given more units which can help towards the GE requirement, graduation, or minimum progress requirements.
  2. Cons:
    • Community colleges do not offer upper division courses and courses taken at the community college will not factor into your UC Davis GPA.
    • Many students want to complete their preparatory work at a community college (MAT, BIS, CHE, PHY), but it is not recommended to break apart series and take them at different schools. This is because classes at a community college might not correlate with Davis’ structure.

Another important concept that most students get confused with is the difference between a class being articulated and a class being transferred. If a class articulates, that means that a class at a community college is equivalent to a class at UC Davis, and the student will get credit for completing the course. On the other hand, if a class is just transferable, then the student will only receive units for having completed the course. To check if classes at your community college can be articulated use assist.org. Assist.org is a great website to see which classes at a community college articulate to another 4 year institution.

Other Four-Year Institutions: Although there is an articulation database (assist.org) that links community colleges directly to 4-year institutions, there is not one that links 4-year institutions with other 4-year institutions. This is important because if a student wanted to go to another UC or a California State University (CSU) , that student would have to be more proactive in finding an articulation for the class he or she is interested in taking. For example, if a student wants to take a psychology course at Cal State Fullerton, he or she would have to bring in the syllabus from Fullerton and take it to the psychology department at UC Davis. The psychology department would then decide if the class at Fullerton can be articulated to a class at UC Davis or if more information is needed.

  • Similar to community colleges, classes at CSU campuses will not be considered in your UC Davis GPA. However, classes from another UC (UCLA for example) will be added into your UC GPA.

Summer Sessions at UC Davis: Taking classes at another UC campus offers additional benefits than a community college or a California State University:

  • Taking summer classes at a UC can help improve your UC cumulative GPA.
  • Repeating courses can only be done at a UC campus if your intention is to replace the initial grade received in the course.
  • Many lower and upper division courses needed for your major, university, and college requirements are offered at UC Davis during the summer.

Extra information for UC Davis  Summer session:

Dates for Summer Sessions 2017:

Summer Session 1: Jun 26 – Aug 4

Summer Session 2: Aug 7 -Sep 15

Special Session: Jun 19-Sep 15

Pass times appointments: Registration begins May 1 st. Please see your schedule builder for your specific Pass time.

If you are receiving financial aid at UC Davis, simply register for classes on your designated appointment time and the financial aid office will distribute financial aid based on the classes registered. I suggest to go to the financial aid office, located on 1st  floor of Dutton hall, to see a financial aid officer to discuss options for financial aid. For more information about classes offered, fees, and other important dates visit  http://summer-sessions.ucdavis.edu/

Brenda Garibay

5th year, Biological Sciences Major

B.A.S.C. Peer Adviser

 

Career Spotlight: Social Workers

Do you see yourself helping people cope with challenges in their lives: assisting with family changes, advising students to do better in school, or treating mental, behavioral, and emotional disorders? Although these problems in people’s lives are challenging to work with, being a social worker can be a rewarding position. There are various types of social workers who focus on assisting different groups of people.

  1. Child and Family: Social workers help families find assistance, such as child-care and/or benefits. Benefits can include food stamps, clothing, or healthcare. These type of social workers may also arrange adoptions, locate foster families, or help bring families back together depending on the agency they work for and their specialties.
  2. School: These social workers focus on the children’s behaviors at school. They help develop strategies for better academic performance.
  3. Clinical: Usually referred to as licensed clinical social worker (LCSW). These social workers primarily help people cope or change behaviors in regards to mental, behavioral and emotional disorders.
  4. Healthcare: Social workers will help patients adjust back to their lives after being diagnosed with an illness or disease. There are additional specialties within healthcare, such as geriatric social workers, hospice and palliative social workers as well as medical social workers. Geriatric social workers focus on assisting the elderly and their families. Hospice and palliative help patients with chronic or terminal illnesses. Medical social workers work with hospital staff to help patients feel comfortable in the hospital.
  5. Mental health and substance abuse: Social workers mainly work with mental illnesses and addictions.

social_work_jobsBecause social workers help with challenging situations in people’s lives, there are certain characteristics that are highly valued in a social worker. Compassionate social workers are important because they are helping people in stressful situations. Having compassion allows for a better connection between the social worker and their clients. Another essential quality is interpersonal skills. Social workers are working with many different people which means they need effective people skills to communicate appropriately. Having good interpersonal skills includes problem solving, decision making, listening, and negotiating.

Now that you have been introduced to the components and qualities of a social worker, you may wonder how to become one ?

For most entry-level positions, a bachelor’s is required in social work (BSW). Entry-level position duties can include: case management; connecting individuals with resources; and in some circumstances entry-level social workers can provide counseling. Although attaining a BSW is advantageous, related subjects, such as psychology or sociology are accepted for MSW programs. More advanced positions such as, health care or school related positions require a master’s degree in social work (MSW). For example, clinical social workers are expected to attain a master’s degree and have 2 years or  approximately 3,000 hours of supervised clinical experience. After hours are completed clinical social workers must pass a clinical exam to to be licensed. In addition to attaining an MSW, social workers are required to have some sort of license or certification depending on the state. For specific requirements for each state checkout SocialWorkLicensure.org.

Quick STATS

2012 Median pay: $44,200 per year, $21.25 per hour

Job Outlook, 2012-2022: 19%- Faster than average

Local programs: There are MSW programs at California State University, Sacramento, San Francisco State University and California State University, East Bay.

Social work is a rewarding position that anyone who is interested in helping people may consider. This career has a broad range of specialties which allows one to help people in various situations. if you want more information check out: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/community-and-social-service/social-workers.htm#tab-1.

 

Brenda Garibay

4th year, Biological Sciences Major

B.A.S.C. Peer Adviser

First Round of Midterms are Coming !!!

UC Davis is now moving along the third week of classes, which means that students’ first round of midterms are around the corner. Midterms can be stressful because these exams could be almost 30% of a student’s grade! However, it is important to channel that stress into preparing properly for classes. Of course, it takes a lot of self determination to study independently, but there are so many resources on campus that can help you get to those As and Bs! Below are potential resources a student can use to prepare for future exams and excel in their classes.

South HallThe Student Academic Success Center (SASC) is one of the most important academic resources on campus. This center is home to a variety of programs, but for academics the SASC offers drop-in tutoring for various subjects, such as, biology, chemistry, physics, etc….. for the drop-in schedule check out the SASC Webpage. Most of the drop-in tutoring is located in South Hall or Dutton Hall. I used this resource for all of my preparatory coursework, specifically, chemistry and physics. I would set a block of time every week to attend drop-in hours to finish assignments and clear any confusion I had from lecture. For freshmen living at the dorms, there is drop-in tutoring in the evenings hosted by SASC but located in the living communities. For the drop-in tutoring schedule at the Academic Advising Centers check out the RHAT webpage.

  • SASC offers workshops for math, organic chemistry, general chemistry, and physics. I credit these workshops for successfully getting me through my preparatory classes. The workshops are taught by specialists and go hand-in-hand with the lectures from class. Most of the specialists work closely with the instructors of the various courses. Therefore, they can give accurate tips on  how to be successful in these classes. Also, the specialists have scheduled office hours throughout the week.

Another resource a student should be taking advantage of is office hours. The most important ones to attend are the professor’s office hours. I always suggest to a student that it is in their best interest to attend their professor’s office hours because they are the ones creating the exam. Most students are intimidated to speak to their professors, but professors want his or her students to succeed!

Tips for Office Hours:

  • Go Prepared. A student should never attend office hours unprepared. He or she should come with questions or practice problems.
  • Get to know your professor. If you are up to date on everything presented in class and have no questions, it can be a good idea to go to your professor’s office hours and get to know him or her. Ask them about their research or hobbies. This can demonstrate your interest in the subject they teach and the research they do, which could potentially lead to obtaining a letter of recommendation or an opportunity to participate in their research.

Professors are not the only ones who hold office hours. Every class typically has TAs that assist with discussion  sections. The awesome part is a student can attend any of the the TAs’ office hours for that class. Therefore, there is no excuse not to get help!

Now that you have all the resources to clear up any confusion from class, you will need to figure out how to study effectively. Some students already have their strategy for success, but others might not have found their study strategy just yet. Well look no further then the Student Academic Success Center. SASC offers study skills workshops on topics, such as Time Management, TNote Taking Skills, and More! For a complete list of workshops with dates & times visit the SASC webpage.

Although you have gone to every office hour possible, attended as many workshops as you can, and learned how to take the best notes, you will have to take the time to sit down and study! It is important that a student finds the perfect place to study effectively. My favorite spot on campus is the 24 hour study lounge because it is filled with hard working students, which encourages me to keep on studying. My favorite off-campus place to study is at Mishka’s Cafe located in downtown Davis. They have the best peanut butter cookie I have ever tasted!

Always remember to try your best and do everything possible to reach your academic goals! Good luck on your first round of midterms.

 

 

Brenda Garibay

Fourth Year, Class of 2016

Biological Sciences, Emphasis in Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior

Biology Academic Success Center Peer Adviser