Animal Facilities on Campus

If UC Davis was a category in the game Taboo, one of the tabooed words would be “animal.” UC Davis is internationally acclaimed for our animal facilities. There are so many resources available to expand your knowledge, which may be particularly appealing for Evolution, Ecology and Biodiversity or Marine and Coastal Science majors, or just if you love animals. Take advantage of all the unique opportunities our campus has to offer-whether it is simply to learn more, or to get involved!

Dairy Facility

Animal Facilities

One of the most notable animal facilities on campus is our iconic dairy cow barn near the Tercero Residence Halls. However, there are many more located all throughout campus. Most of them are open to students interested in learning more. If the gate is open, you are welcome to walk in and talk to a staff member. The facilities generally have open hours for the public. Here are just a few examples:

California Raptor Center

The Raptor Center is open for free, self-guided tours during their open hours Monday-Friday from 9am-4pm and Saturday from 9am-12pm. You can learn about the rehabilitation of all kinds of raptors like red-tailed hawks, golden eagles, or barn owls.

Avian Facility

There are three Avian facilities on campus: Hopkins Avian Facility, Meyer Hall Hatchery, and Meyer Hall Avian Facility. The Hopkins Avian Facility is located across from the University Airport and houses species including chickens, parrots, kestrels, and finches. Meyer Hall Hatchery supplies chicks and eggs to other Avian facilities and departments on campus. The Meyer Hall Avian Facility is an intensive research facility with controlled environments and chambers.

Aquatic Animals

The Center for Aquatic Biology and Aquaculture (CABA) Aquatic Center located on campus by the University Airport is the largest freshwater fish research facility of all the University of California campuses. Besides acting as a research space, some Aquatic Center animals are released to natural reserves at Putah Creek and Jamison Pond. It is open for tours by appointment during its open hours Monday-Friday from 8am-5pm.

Horse Barn

The Horse Barn is mostly run by students and houses several stallions available to the public, with proceeds going back towards the equine education program. Tours are available by appointment during open hours: Monday-Friday from 8am-5pm. Fun fact: the one-and-only Gunrock was housed at the House Barn in the 1920s.

Cole Facility

The Cole facility is a research facility with many studies involving cattle, goats, sheep, and pigs. It also encompasses the Meat Lab and the Small Animal Laboratory, which houses rabbits, hamsters, rats and mice. The Meat Lab is located in Cole C Facility and is open for meat sales on Thursday and Friday from 1pm-5:30pm.

Learn more about each Animal Facility here:

http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu/facilities/

Get details about the Meat Lab here:

http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu/facilities/meat/index.html

Animal Facilities

Barn Residency Program

Can’t get enough of these precious animals? UC Davis offers a Barn Residency Program, which is an opportunity to live-in at one of the nine animal facilities on campus. In exchange for housing, students work in the facility for approximately 10 hours per week. The facilities include: Dairy Barn, Swine Barn, Horse Barn, Sheep Barn, Beef Barn, Feedlot, Feed mill, Hopkins Avian Facility, and Goat Barn. Animals and free rent? Moo yeah! Check out the website below for specific requirements (you have to be able to lift a bale of hay):

http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu/asac/barn-residency.html

You don’t have to be an Animal Science or animal-related major to immerse yourself in the opportunities that the campus has to offer. This is an underrated benefit of attending an agriculture school-don’t miss out!

Amanda Dao
BASC Peer Advisor
3rd year, Neurobiology, Physiology, & Behavior Major

Exploring UC Davis’ Fitness Resources

As busy college students, it is easy to forget to self-care and maintain our physical health. However, as finals approach, it’s particularly important to take time to de-stress and relax. I have personally found that an excellent way to do this is by sticking with a general rule- exercise in any form, 4 times a week and in 30 minute increments.

Here are several great exercise resources to consider as a UC Davis student:

The UC Davis ARC

The indoor track, weight room and huge collection of exercise machines can give you the perfect workout at no extra cost during the school year. However, during the summer, you must be a registered in summer courses or else there is an extra fee. Jogging, strength training, heavy lifting, circuit training- these are all fantastic ways to stay in shape!

If you are new to the gym, the ARC provides personal trainers who can help you set long-term goals and learn how to safely use the huge collection of weights and machines in the building. Other facilities, such as the swimming pools and rock climbing walls, are also available.

Group exercise classes are also a great way to learn a new workout routine under supervised instruction. Available classes range from cycling to Zumba.

If you already enjoy playing a sport, Intramurals (IMs) are a fun way to meet people and team up for playing with friendly competition. Sports offered include basketball, flag football, volleyball, kickball, pickleball, soccer, softball, tennis, ultimate frisbee and even Quidditch. If you do not have a ready formed team,  you are still welcome to register for IMs as a free agent. More information on personal training, group exercises classes and intramurals can be found at the CRU website.

https://cru.ucdavis.edu/content/1-activities-and-recreation-center-arc.htm

PE Classes

The UC Davis Department of Physical Education provides a huge range of PE classes every quarter that are open to all undergraduate students. Classes are usually offered for 0.5 units, and meet for 2 hours every week. UCD students are allowed to take up to 6 units of PE classes for credit in their academic career (more classes may be taken beyond 6 units, but students will not receive credit for these classes). A huge variety of sports at every level is available, and the instruction is excellent because many classes are taught by seasoned trainers or university athletic coaches.  Courses include kickboxing, rock-climbing, volleyball and weight-training, just to name a few.

http://pe.ucdavis.edu/classes

CRU Outdoor Adventures

Particularly popular for summer adventures with friends, the CRU Outdoor Adventures center offers exciting ways to be active through white river rafting, hiking and camping trips in beautiful natural areas around California. More information can be found here:

https://cru.ucdavis.edu/outdooradventures

Although taking time away from work or study may seem counterintuitive, this strategy actually optimizes performance because exercise hugely boosts energy levels and concentration. Exercising regularly not only benefits your general well-being, but also greatly increases your studying productivity.

Take time out of your schedule to have fun and energize!

Janis Kim
4th Year Biological Sciences Major
BASC Peer Adviser

What’s up with the new pre-req check?

This past week, we all received an email about how starting Fall 2017, Schedule Builder will automatically be enforcing prerequisites for courses. Since then, we’ve had several students come into the Biology Academic Success Center (BASC) to inquire as to what that means. If that email was the first time you’ve heard about the new pre-req check, then congratulations,  this means that you completed all of the prerequisites for your classes for this quarter. The College of Biological Sciences actually started using Schedule Builder’s automatic prerequisite checking system for Spring 2017 registration. However, as of Fall 2017 registration, the practice will be campus-wide.

To view the prerequisites for a course, search for the course in schedule builder and then click “show details” on the right side of the screen. Under the course description, you will see the prerequisites for the course listed.

So how will this prerequisite checking system affect your registration? Ultimately, if you are staying on top of your prerequisites, it won’t! However, say you want to register for a class, let’s call it ABC 123, that you haven’t completed the listed prerequisite for, you will now have to fill out a prerequisite petition that is made available to you on Schedule Builder. Also, if you think that another class you have taken has prepared you to be successful for ABC 123, you still have to complete the petition. Let’s take a look at what that would be like.

For the purpose of this blog, I added BIS 104 into my schedule. I have not completed one of its prerequisites, BIS 101, so the following message popped up:

bis 104 no pre req.PNG

Now, let’s say that hypothetically I was planning on taking the equivalent of BIS 101 at UCLA over the summer, so I decided to complete the the prerequisite petition so that I could still register for BIS 104. I would then click on the prerequisite petition and fill it out. This is what it would look like:

pre req petition

Here, I could explain my situation and upload evidence that I was registered for the equivalent of BIS 101 at UCLA. It is recommended that you include as much information on the prerequisite course as possible (expanded course description and/or course syllabus).

As soon as you submit the petition, Schedule Builder will allow you to register for the given class. You do not need to wait for it to be approved. The approval process will not happen until pass 2 (which is in August or September for Fall 2017 registration). At this point, it is at the instructor’s discretion if they approve the petition or not. If they decide not to approve it, then you will be dropped from the course. Therefore, do not assume that if you fill out the petition and register for the class, you will guaranteed a spot.

Also, make sure that when you’re filling out the petition that you are specific about why you do not need to take the listed prerequisite. If you are submitting the petition because you think a different class should suffice as a prerequisite, then be specific about what topics were covered and how it prepared you.
Another feature of this update, is that Schedule Builder will warn you if you save a class that you are currently enrolled in the prerequisite for. Don’t worry, this alert won’t prevent you from registering! However, if you don’t pass the prerequisite class, then you will be dropped from the class, again, at the discretion of the instructor.

pre req in progress.PNG

In fact, dropping you from the class is not the only thing that is up to the instructor’s discretion, it is also their decision to participate in the prerequisite checking system at all. Some may opt out. So if you notice that you haven’t completed a prerequisite for a class, but are not blocked from registration, this may be the case. That being said, as advisers, we strongly recommend completing the prerequisite(s) before you take a class regardless.

Good luck registering and be sure to come into BASC if you have any questions about the prerequisite check or about registration in general.

Katie Galsterer
3rd Year Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior Major
Nutrition Science Minor
BASC Peer Advisor

Classes During The Summer

Winter quarter has just started, but it is never too early to start thinking about your plan for the summer. There are many options; you can work, intern, or just relax on a couch all day! But if the thought of taking classes during the summer has entered your  mind then there are few details to consider. For example,  you may want to consider the difference between taking classes at a community college, another 4 year institution, or UC Davis. In addition, it’s important to know the difference between classes that articulate versus transfer when attending an institution outside of UC Davis. Knowing this information is critical in making the best decision for your academic future, but lucky for you it is all located below.

 Why consider taking classes during the summer?

  • A student can complete additional units towards his or her degree and can help a student graduate within 4 years.
  • A student can use summer school to meet minimum progress. For information on minimum progress visit https://registrar.ucdavis.edu/records/transcripts/academic-standing.cfm
  •  Summer school is a great option for students who have had trouble getting into classes during the academic year.
  • Taking courses during summer can lead to a more balanced work load during the academic year.
  • Students can take courses in order to satisfy their GE requirements or a minor.

Students have the ability to take classes at a community college, at another four year institution, or stay at UC Davis. Below I will summarize how to navigate through these different options and why each of these options may be a good idea for you:

Community Colleges:

  1. Pros:
    • Community college is usually close to home! Many students at UC Davis are far from home and want to head back for their summer vacation. Also living at home could potentially be cheaper in terms of housing.
    • Community college can save you money! UC Davis summer sessions are more pricey than completing courses at a community college. Community college fees are approximately $46 a unit.
    • Most community colleges are on the semester system and have different way of calculating units.  To convert the semester units to quarter units, multiply the semester units by 1.5. For example, 3 units at a community college on the semester system is converted to 4.5 units at UC Davis. This can be a great reason to take courses at a community college because you are given more units which can help towards the GE requirement, graduation, or minimum progress requirements.
  2. Cons:
    • Community colleges do not offer upper division courses and courses taken at the community college will not factor into your UC Davis GPA.
    • Many students want to complete their preparatory work at a community college (MAT, BIS, CHE, PHY), but it is not recommended to break apart series and take them at different schools. This is because classes at a community college might not correlate with Davis’ structure.

Another important concept that most students get confused with is the difference between a class being articulated and a class being transferred. If a class articulates, that means that a class at a community college is equivalent to a class at UC Davis, and the student will get credit for completing the course. On the other hand, if a class is just transferable, then the student will only receive units for having completed the course. To check if classes at your community college can be articulated use assist.org. Assist.org is a great website to see which classes at a community college articulate to another 4 year institution.

Other Four-Year Institutions: Although there is an articulation database (assist.org) that links community colleges directly to 4-year institutions, there is not one that links 4-year institutions with other 4-year institutions. This is important because if a student wanted to go to another UC or a California State University (CSU) , that student would have to be more proactive in finding an articulation for the class he or she is interested in taking. For example, if a student wants to take a psychology course at Cal State Fullerton, he or she would have to bring in the syllabus from Fullerton and take it to the psychology department at UC Davis. The psychology department would then decide if the class at Fullerton can be articulated to a class at UC Davis or if more information is needed.

  • Similar to community colleges, classes at CSU campuses will not be considered in your UC Davis GPA. However, classes from another UC (UCLA for example) will be added into your UC GPA.

Summer Sessions at UC Davis: Taking classes at another UC campus offers additional benefits than a community college or a California State University:

  • Taking summer classes at a UC can help improve your UC cumulative GPA.
  • Repeating courses can only be done at a UC campus if your intention is to replace the initial grade received in the course.
  • Many lower and upper division courses needed for your major, university, and college requirements are offered at UC Davis during the summer.

Extra information for UC Davis  Summer session:

Dates for Summer Sessions 2017:

Summer Session 1: Jun 26 – Aug 4

Summer Session 2: Aug 7 -Sep 15

Special Session: Jun 19-Sep 15

Pass times appointments: Registration begins May 1 st. Please see your schedule builder for your specific Pass time.

If you are receiving financial aid at UC Davis, simply register for classes on your designated appointment time and the financial aid office will distribute financial aid based on the classes registered. I suggest to go to the financial aid office, located on 1st  floor of Dutton hall, to see a financial aid officer to discuss options for financial aid. For more information about classes offered, fees, and other important dates visit  http://summer-sessions.ucdavis.edu/

Brenda Garibay

5th year, Biological Sciences Major

B.A.S.C. Peer Adviser

Internships

As your first year at Davis is coming to an end, have you been thinking about finding an internship? UC Davis offers many internships (i.e. health, business, design, government, law, etc.) so there is always something for everyone. Some ask “will an internship be worth my time”? To make life easier, I listed four reasons (even though there are many more) why internships are beneficial and why you should participate in an internship!

First: The Experience! Wouldn’t  it be nice to have an inside look into your future career before fully committing to that career? Internships help you find the right career fit, and allow you to test drive before investing your time and money into a career you may not even enjoy. For example, let’s say you want to become a physician. If you do an internship at a hospital or clinic, you will be able to observe and work alongside a physician, which allows to you see an in-depth look of what really goes on outside of the classroom.

Second: Networking!  Internships provide opportunities to network. You get the opportunity to form close bonds between your colleagues and supervisors, who can eventually become your mentors or write you letters of recommendation. If you are planning on applying for positions where you are interning, you are much more likely to be hired as you are a familiar face and already have relationships with the staff. The internship experience looks great on applications because it will show that you have related experience and are therefore highly qualified for the position.

Third: Develop New Skills! Everyone can benefit from building new skills. Internships teach you many things, not only the in and outs of the field you are interning in but also other transferable skills such as improved interpersonal communication, working on a team, and/or expressing empathy.

Fourth: Earn Course Credits and/or Transcript Notation! Yes, you heard right, not only do you get to earn experience, opportunities, and new skills from internships but you may also earn UNITS and/or the internship appears on your transcript, which is managed through ICC. It is a win-win for everyone. Many students take advantage of this opportunity during the summer because there are fewer students at UC Davis and to be considered a full-time student and to be qualified for financial aid a student must be enrolled in a minimum of six units.

I have been involved in many internships and can say that I learned something from each one. Each internship was a wonderful experience that provided a different view on my future career. Through the internships, I learned what I am passionate about as well as things that I knew were not a right fit for me. Remember if you are applying to an internship you have to start the process the quarter/summer before you get involved. Step out of your comfort zone and get involved as soon as you can! There are tons of internships available and if you are interested in an internship that we do not offer, the staff at the Internship and Career Center (ICC) will try their best to get you an internship you like. Visit the Internship and Career Center in South Hall today!

Rufa Pazyuk
BASC Peer Advisor
Fourth Year: Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior and Religious Studies Double Major

Career Spotlight: Military Medicine

Are you interested in medicine, but would rather spend more time with your patients than with your paperwork? Does one part of you want to travel the world, but the other part just wants to start your medical career as soon as possible? Then military medicine may be the ideal path for you to have it all and more. Two popular ways of entering military medicine are through the Health Professions Scholarship Program (HPSP) and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) School of Medicine.

Image result for usns comfort and mercy            Image result for military medicine

Major Differences Between HPSP & USUHS:

Finance: Both the HPSP and USUHS cover the full cost of medical school including tuition and other associated mandatory fees. Beyond that, each has additional financial perks. (see websites below)

HPSP: Apply for either a 3 or 4 year scholarship (through the Navy, Army, or Air Force) independent of medical school applications. The scholarship covers tuition and required fees at any accredited medical school in the United States or Puerto Rico. This option offers more flexibility in terms of choosing where you want to spend the next four years.

  • A monthly stipend of approximately $2,200/month for cost of living on top of an initial $20,000 sign-on bonus.

USUHS: Applying to USUHS is like applying to any other medical school through AMCAS, but there is no fee for secondary applications and no tuition costs. The school is located in Bethesda, Maryland.

  • While enrolled, students are paid the equivalent of a Second Lieutenant (approximately $63,000/year).

Service Obligation: Upon graduation, students earn an officer rank of O-3.

HPSP: Service obligation is year-for-year depending on how long you receive the scholarship, in addition to one 45 day Active Duty Tour per academic year, one of which is a 5 week Officer Development School (details vary depending on branch).

USUHS: Service obligation is a minimum of 7 years. All incoming students attend a 4 to 6 week, branch-specific officer orientation program to learn about officer responsibilities and military customs, prior to matriculation.

Major Benefits of Military Medicine:

See the World: A common piece of advice given to pre-med students is to take time to travel before enrolling into medical school because there won’t be time for a long time afterwards. As a military physician, you can travel the world as part of your job and participate in international humanitarian missions. Even during vacations, military physicians have access to low-cost, on-base lodging around the world.

Residency: More and more seats in medical schools are opening, but additional residency spots are not opening at the same rate. As a result, many newly-graduated medical students struggle to get a residency spot in their top choice specialty (Robeznieks). Each of the military branches offer a wide variety of specialties in addition to the option of completing a civilian residency, thus increasing the available residency opportunities for military physicians.

Logistics/Patient Care: Civilian medicine is not simply patient-doctor interactions. It comes with a long list of logistics relating to business and finance including equipment and office management, malpractice insurance, endless stacks of paperwork, and more. Military medicine minimizes these miscellaneous responsibilities in order to maximize time spent with working with patients in order to provide the best possible care available. (see websites below)

Intrinsic Reward: In my opinion, working with military families on a military base last summer was one of the most rewarding experiences I have had so far in my college career and has shifted the direction of my own career goals. There is definitely a unique feeling of pride and respect that comes from helping the people who serve our country and their families who sacrifice a lot in their own way.

Related image

Military healthcare is not limited to Medical Corps. There are also programs for Nurse Corps, Dental Corps, and more. Each branch has minor differences in the programs and work environments, so I encourage you to look further into the Navy, Army, and Air Force to explore which branch or program might work for you.

For more information, contact your local recruiter and check out the respective websites below:

Navy: https://www.navy.com/careers/healthcare/medicine.html#ft-specialties-subspecialties

Army: http://www.goarmy.com/amedd.html

Air Force: http://www.airforcemedicine.af.mil/Media-Center/Fact-Sheets/Display/Article/425437/hpsp-fact-sheet/

USUHShttps://www.usuhs.edu/sites/default/files/media/medschool/pdf/whatyouneedtoknow.pdf

Works Cited:

Robeznieks, Andis. “Match Day nears, with worries there still aren’t enough residency slots.” Modern Healthcare. 18 March 2015. Web. <http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20150318/NEWS/150319897>.

Amanda Dao
3rd Year Neurobiology, Physiology & Behavior Major; Art History Minor
BASC Peer Advisor

Differences Between The Two Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior Majors

n          p            b

Have you heard students saying they are part of the new Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior (NPB) major? Did you know there was a new NPB major? As of Fall 2016, the College of Biological Sciences introduced a new NPB major, which has significant differences from the old NPB major. Therefore, it is very important that a student knows which requirements they are to expected to follow because you cannot combine the requirements from both majors. Some students have the choice of choosing between the two majors while other students must complete requirements for the new major. A student that has been enrolled in UC Davis prior to Fall 2016 has the option of choosing which major they would like to pursue. However, a student that started UC Davis Fall 2016 or later must follow the new NPB requirements, unless they are a transfer student. If the student is a transfer student they have the option of choosing between the two majors if they started college prior to Fall 2016. This blog will further explain the differences between the two majors and provide suggestions to students who are deciding which requirements to follow.

Pre-Fall 2016- “Old” NPB Major

We will start with first going over the old NPB major. The first two years are exactly the same in both majors because students are taking their major prscreen-shot-2017-02-27-at-5-23-49-pmerequisites courses (BIS 2ABC, CHE 2ABC, MAT 17ABC/MAT 21AB, CHE 118 ABC/CHE 8AB, and PHY 7ABC). Other courses that both majors require are STA 100, BIS 101, and either BIS 102 and 103 or BIS 105. After these courses, these two majors have differences in the courses required. For the Pre-Fall 2016 major, a student would need to take BIS 104, NPB 100, 101, 102, NPB lab, and an evolution course (ANT 151, GEL 107, EVE 100). Then, the student has to take at least 12 units from the depth courses list. The depth courses list has many different classes, which allows students to explore and create a unique schedule that would best fit them.

Fall 2016-“NEW” NPB Major

As mentioned before, this major also requires the major prerequisites courses (BIS 2ABC, CHE 2ABC, MAT 17ABC/MAT 21AB, CHE 118 ABC/CHE 8AB, and PHY 7ABC) and STA 100, BIS 101, and either BIS 102 and 103 oscreen-shot-2017-02-27-at-5-24-17-pmr Bis 105. The main difference for this major is that it has a new series (NPB 110ABC) and you get to choose a track: Physio, Neuro, or Organism-Environmental Interactions (OEI).  This major no longer requires BIS 104 or an evolution course because curriculum from these courses are already included in NPB 110ABC with a focus on how it connects to behavior. Each track has its own set of requirements, such as taking a certain NPB lab and then having to take at least 12 units from the approved list of classes provided. Finally, you have to take at least 3 units from the “Extra Elective” column and that completes the major. This new major allows you to have a more in depth knowledge of either Physio, Neuro, or Organism-Environmental Interactions by taking classes that are more specific to that field, while also allowing you to create your own unique schedule because of the many courses you have to choose from.

Additional Considerations:

  1. How far along are you on the old vs. the new requirements? Would it be a smooth transition?
    • If you are a first or second year, the transition would be very smooth. However, if you are in your third or fourth year you should consider which classes you have already taken.
  2. Can the classes you have already completed for the old major be used to satisfy requirements for the new major?
    • For example, if you already took NPB 100, NPB 101, and BIS 104 it would be best to stick with the old major instead of re-taking the NPB 110 series and receiving limited units. Since the courses (NPB 100 & 101) are very similar to to NPB 110B & C, you will only receive 2 units per course instead of the 5 units.

Frequently Asked Questions:

  1. I’m a first year/second year student, and I could easily do either major. Which set of major requirements do you recommend? Which one is better?
    • Neither is better, and each has its own advantages. For example, the core classes (100, 101, 102) for the old major can be taken out of order, allowing for some more flexibility (NPB 110 ABC must be taken in order).
  2. Will NPB 110C satisfy requirements for health professions such as PT, RN, or PA school?
    • Yes, both NPB 101 and NPB 110C would satisfy the requirement because graduate schools that require a physiology course should accept any upper division physiology course intended for science majors.
  3. Can I mix and match the old and new major requirements?
    • No, and that is why it is very important to figure out which major you want to pursue and stick with it.

The new NPB Major was created because faculty members decided to update the major requirements because of science advantages. However, both majors provide students with a broad NPB education and a rewarding academic experience. If you have any other questions or still having a hard time choosing between the to majors, please do not hesitate to visit the BASC website or a peer/staff advisor at the Biology Academic Success Center!

Rufa Pazyuk
BASC Peer Advisor
Fourth Year, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior and Religious Studies Double Major