Plant Facilities of UC Davis

I am an Evolution, Ecology, and Biodiversity major and a huge biology nerd with a special passion for herpetology, but before going through the BIS 2C labs – tracing plant evolution from bryophytes through monocots, and studying the adaptations of the miraculous plant world – I had never bothered giving plants much thought. My eyes were opened as a 2nd year when I took BIS 2C. I am now a plant enthusiast almost as much as I am a snake enthusiast, and I credit UC Davis and our incredible plant facilities and collections on campus to sparking my interest. Here are a few of the many plant facilities that UC Davis has to offer.

The Arboretum

Probably the most popular plant exhibit on campus – the Arboretum is a long stretch of gardens, plant collections, and paved walkways along the pond where the North fork of Putah Creek historically flowed. Among their plant collections include the Shields Oak Grove on the West side of the Arboretum, with an astounding diversity of large oak species, and the T. Elliot Weier Redwood Grove, a perfect spot for a nicely shaded picnic near the Southeast side of campus. The Arboretum is lined with plant collections from around the world, including South American, Mediterranean, South West U.S.A./Mexican, East Asian, and California foothill collections. The Arboretum is open to the public all day, all week, and all year and seasonally holds plant sales. Last year I bought my first carnivorous plant at the Arboretum plant sales!

Plant Conservatory

Most of us are probably aware of the greenhouse on top of the Science Laboratory Building, but have you been inside? Did you know that the Science Lab greenhouse is just the start of what the UC Davis Plant Conservatory has to offer? The Plant Conservatory runs a lot of the campus’s plant propagation needs, including preparing divisions for the Arboretum plant sales. In addition to the Science Lab Building greenhouse, the Conservatory operates several greenhouses with an astounding collection of tropical and arid plants located behind Storer Hall. The greenhouses operated by the Plant Conservatory are open to the public for drop in hours during the day as well as guided tours – check the Center for Plant Diversity website for more information.

Center for Plant Diversity Herbarium

In addition to the Plant Conservatory greenhouses, the Center for Plant Diversity provides a great resource for researchers, amateur plant biologists, or anyone with a curiosity for plant identification. The Herbarium is a repository of over 300,000 preserved plant samples and lengthy species keys managed by UC Davis resident plant identification experts. You can take samples to the Herbarium for accurate identification, free of charge for the first 5 times each year. The Herbarium is now located in the Science Laboratory Building on the first floor, right next to the Biology Academic Success Center!

Other plant resources

The CAES greenhouses, west of campus by the stadium, are available to rent space through a simple google form.

The Plant Conservatory’s controlled environment facilities serve as an incredibly helpful research tool to plant, agriculture, and environmental sciences among others. These state-of-the-art climate controlled chambers are available to rent monthly.

Hopefully attending a school with such a strong reputation in agriculture and plant biology will instill in you an interest for plants like it did me. It’s a great time to start learn how to garden or pick up some interesting house plants. Here are my indoor plants I’ve collected since taking BIS 2C:

Justin Waskowiak
BASC Peer Advisor
Third Year: Evolution, Ecology, and Biodiversity

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Things To Do During Summer Break

Wanting to be productive during our long and winding 3+ months of summer break? Just in need of ideas to spend your time instead of wallowing around in your bed binge-watching 12 seasons of Grey’s Anatomy? Here are some ideas to fill up your summer plans.

  1. Travel.
    This one is a given. Go out and explore the world with your loved ones, by yourself or even strangers!
  2. Summer Session.
    Take advantage of the smaller class sizes and get ahead in your major or GE requirements. Plus, the campus is relatively empty so there are more study spaces available and you can actually get one of those coveted outlets in the library. If you want to stay at home for the summer, you can take community college courses. Even more convenient, there are a wide variety of online courses offered by community colleges. Check out assist.org to find out if a community college course articulates to a course here at UC Davis.
  3. Study Abroad.
    What’s better than traveling? Traveling AND earning course credit! Studying abroad gives you an opportunity to make connections with UC Davis faculty in small group sizes. There are a wide variety of programs, including ones that can satisfy your major requirements. Imagine taking BIS 2A in Ireland, BIS 102 in Japan, MIC 102/103L in Thailand or BIS 101 in Europe! For more information about study abroad, visit their website or the Study Abroad office in the International Center.
  4. Internships.
    Do a Health-Related Internship to try and see if a certain health field is for you. Also check out Aggie Job Link for more internship availabilities. Visit the ICC this spring to find internship ideas in the field of your choice.
  5. Work.
    Make real-world connections while earning money! Check out Aggie Job Link for job openings. Consider attending Internship and Career Center workshops and advising to polish up your resume/CV and other requirements to apply.
  6. Learn a new hobby.
    Summer would be a perfect time to finally get to learn how to play the guitar which you’ve been longing to do since you were 10 years old. Other ideas:

    • Learn how to cook
    • Learn how to juggle
    • Take a salsa class/other dance classes
    • Take an art class
    • Take up hot yoga- it’ll be hot enough outside to do it without the fancy facility and without the cost!
    • Take up bird watching
  7. Volunteer.
    Volunteering not only provides vital help to those in need but can also help provide a sense of purpose and increase your social skills. Volunteering for a nonprofit organization can also be a wonderful way to explore career choices and can lead to job opportunities. You can volunteer at soup kitchens, SPCA/local animal shelters, summer camps, etc. Sign up for the Community Service Opportunities listserv through the Internship and Career Center (ICC) in order to receive regular volunteer opportunities around the area. They have both one-time and ongoing opportunities to fit your interests– volunteering doesn’t have to take up most of your busy schedule.
  8. Go outdoors.
    Go to the rec pool or the beach. Go camping, white-water rafting, stargazing, parasailing… the possibilities are endless. Summer is a wonderful opportunity to be one with nature so take advantage of its beauty and fun.
  9. Study for Graduate Entrance Exams. Are you planning to take the MCAT? The GRE? The PCAT? Summer allows you time to study for these exams, without having to also balance your time studying for classes. Some students are naturally good at taking tests and committing to studying alone– so it’s up to you if you want to enroll in a test prep course. Buy a test prep book and study on your own or enroll in a course and gear up to take these exams!
  10. Other ideas:
    • Concerts/Music festivals
    • Read books (for fun!)
    • Go to a play
    • Film festivals
    • Get a head start on your fall classes
    • Check out Campus Recreation and Unions for opportunities to get involved in youth programs, Outdoor Adventures and more.
    • The ASUCD Experimental College also offers exciting classes such as martial arts, dance and music year-round, including the summer. Check them out!

Shiela Angulo
4th year Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Class of 2017
BASC Peer Advisor

Resources for Pre-Health Students

Are you interested in medicine but do not want to take the long path and 663go through medical school to reach your dreams? Have no fear, the medical field is extremely broad and you can still have a career within the health field without having to go to medical school. Pretty exciting right? Without further ado, let us talk about some of the resources UC Davis offers if you are considering a health profession.

One of the resources you should visit would be Health Professions Advising (HPA). Joanne Snapp, the Director of Health Professions Advising, has many resources about different health professions. Some of these professions may include Dentistry, Nursing, Physicians Assistant, Occupational Therapy, Veterinary Medicine, Clinical Lab Specialist, Genetic Counseling, and many more. Joanne Snapp also has many workshops that are geared towards specific professions as well as general workshops for anyone interested in health professions. She also lists out required and recommended courses, success stories, process of applying/interviewing, and information about different schools. All this information is accessible on the HPA website where a student is also able to schedule an appointment.

Another helpful resource that is available to you is the Internship and Career Center (ICC). If you are interestedcommunity_outreach in health professions, the best way to “try out” the career is through an internship. This way you would be able to experience the daily life of that profession and see if that is something you would enjoy doing for the rest of your life. Speaking from experience, internships were the key elements that guided me to my current career path. I have participated in multiple internships where I was able to gain hands-on-experience that I would have never learned from a textbook.

In October, UC Davis co-sponsors The Annual UC Davis Pre-Medical and Pre-Health Professions National Conference, which is a great resource to gain knowledge on different health professions. This is the largest pre-medical and pre-health conference in the nation and it is a completely student run organization. This year around 2,000 speakers will be attending from various schools and programs such as Pharmacy, Nursing, Public Health, Podiatric Medicine, and many more. The conference offers more than 350 workshops where you are able to gain insight and engage with speakers on a more personal level. I would highly recommend attending this conference, as it will expand your knowledge and allow you to get a wider understanding of the various health professions available.

The UC Davis Study Abroad is another useful resource because they have medical-internglobal health internships. Their internships are across the global and some of the locations may include: Bolivia, South Africa, India, Peru, and many more. This is great opportunity because you are able to travel as well as gain hands-on-experience in diverse locations, which is great because when the student comes back to the United States they have a new health perspective as well as increased cultural-sensitivity.

The last valuable resource is health professions student organizations. UC Davis offers hundreds of different student organizations and these organizations help you get involved. By getting involved, you surround yourself with other students who have similar career goals and they are able to give you tips and encouragement along this career journey.

As you can see, UC Davis highly values pre-health students and wants to offer many ways for students to find their own success as a health professional. Most of these resources are free of charge so make sure you take advantage of these wonderful opportunities while you still have the chance!

Rufa Pazyuk
BASC Peer Adviser
Second Year, Biological Sciences Major

Staying On Top Of Things-A Guide To First Year Living Off Campus

With the current academic year coming to a close and move-in day to your new apartment getting closer, it is time to prepare for the big move. Moving to an off-campus apartment is such an exciting time; you are living on your own! But…you are living on your own, which means new responsibilities.

Moving away from home into the dorms is a big step, however, highly convenient.  Living in the dorms you are on campus, you are living right next to the wonderful Dining Commons, and you do not have to do any chores! All of this changes once you move to an off-campus apartment: You are no longer on campus, the Dining Commons is not within convenient reach, and yes, you guessed it, you will have chores to take care of. Although moving into your own apartment comes with extra responsibilities, it is easy to make the best out of it by being prepared for what is to come.

Think about time. Living off campus requires extra planning with respect to time. It is important to give extra consideration to travel time when living off-campus; how will you get to campus? Bus, walk, bike, drive? If you prefer taking the bus, begin familiarizing yourself with the bus schedule. It is nice to already know the bus schedule so you do not miss the bus and are late to class. There is also a great UC Davis Mobile App that has the Unitrans schedule for reference. One thing that may be helpful at the beginning of each quarter is to review your class schedule and plan which bus to take so you get to campus with plenty of time to get to class on time. Unitrans is free to all UC Davis students as long as they show a student ID. Similarly, if you choose to walk, bike, or drive (parking permit is required) to campus, leave with enough time so you are not late.
A lot of the time this means waking up extra early!

What happens when you are on campus and have a break between your classes? Do you go home? Do you stay on campus? It is much more time costly to go home between breaks. Going home decreases productivity levels. Chances are you will go home and by the time you get home there is no time to get some good studying done before you have to go back to campus (unless you have a 3+ hour gap). It is encouraged to stay on campus and use this time to study. Begin looking for a favorite study spot on campus, somewhere you are comfortable and can concentrate.

What about food? No more Dining Commons? Well, not necessarily. Even if you are not living in the Residence Halls one can still purchase meal plans and you can do so by following these directions online. If you wish to not purchase a meal plan and plan to prepare your own meals by cooking at home then great! Cooking your own meals has some great advantages: you can cook whatever you wish, staying healthy is easier, and this is a great way to improve cooking skills (I encourage you to also read our “A Healthy Balanced Diet” blog for tips on ways to stay healthy). On campus there is also the Silo and Memorial Union with a variety of food choices.

Do I hear you asking about resources outside of the residence halls? There are a plethora of campus resources available to you scattered throughout our campus. Once you no longer live in the residence halls, the Academic Advising Centers may not be the most convenient place for you. Your first, and most important academic advising resource should be your Dean’s Office. Each college has their own Dean’s Office:

College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences
150 Mrak Hall

College of Biological Sciences
Biology Academic Success Center
1023 Sciences Laboratory Building

College of Engineering
1050 Kemper Hall

College of Letters and Science
200 Social Sciences and Humanities Building

Aside from your respective Dean’s Office, there are plenty other resources available to you. For a bit of information on a few resources available I encourage you to read our Resource Highlight blogs on Health Professions Advising, the Student Community Center, and the Student Academic Success Center. The Center For student Involvement is also a great resources to use to stay connected on campus, get involved in a club, or join an intramural sport; there is plenty to choose from.  Fear not, there are even more resources available to you, do not be afraid to do a little research!

Best of luck!

Alejandra Villa
3rd year Genetics and Genomics major
Biology Academic Success Center Peer Adviser

Decision time!

Congratulations on making it this far! This is such an exciting time- you are getting to choose where you will spend the next four years of your life!

For me, the decision was actually very clear and deep down I knew I would end up choosing UC Davis, but I am such an indecisive person that it took a lot of going back and forth for me to actually commit to going to UC Davis, (I think I signed my Intent to Register on the very last day). I initially thought of UC Davis as “the school off I-80 that is on the way to Tahoe” but after my first visit I began to associate it as an exciting school with a gorgeous campus, big egg heads, and cute and fun downtown. I began to form this opinion of UC Davis during a school field trip in 7th grade on my first college tour. I have a clear picture of walking along the arboretum, sitting on the quad, and walking through the very exciting and busy Memorial Union on that sunny Spring day. I remember having a great time on the trip and really liking that atmosphere. I knew there were many wonderful things about UC Davis, mainly that it was a great science school, and so I began to start picturing myself as a UC Davis student.

When I found out I was accepted, I was very excited because I knew a few people who had gone to school at UC Davis and I always heard positive things from them. My parents had also told me great things about UC Davis, saying that it was one of the last “true college towns.” When they told me this I had no idea what that meant, but after spending four years living in Davis and getting to compare it to other schools, I now know that this is true. Taking a stroll in downtown Davis will allow you to experience the sense of community centered around the school and the excitement about events happening in both the school and the town. Most people that live in Davis seem to be affiliated with the University in some way and are always happy to speak to students and offer advice, which for me was a very positive factor because I really wanted to go to a school with a welcoming and hospitable environment.

I can empathize with many of you who are weighing different factors and trying to decide between your options. An important factor for deciding is thinking about yourself and the type of person you are, and trying to match which school will offer you the most opportunities to succeed both academically and socially. With this in mind, remember that UC Davis has SO MANY different resources and opportunities for a wide variety of students to get involved and feel included in academics and the campus community. Here is a brief list of these resources and opportunities:

Good luck and I hope you are all future Aggies!

Zoe Lim
Peer Adviser
Biology Academic Success Center
Biological Sciences, Class of 2015

 

Health Professions Advising (HPA): Resource Highlight

HPA LogoWelcome back fellow students! I hope you all had a wonderful Spring break and are ready to tackle this new quarter. Now that the bulk of the school year is behind us and you are more or less settled into your academic groove, it is a perfect time to start thinking about the possibility of a professional health career! Some of you may already be decided on a health career and some of you may just be curious about the various options available. Fortunately for you, UC Davis has a wonderful resource for all students considering a health profession!


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Joanne Snapp, M.S. E.d.

Health Professions Advising (HPA) is a great resource to turn to if you are interested in a health career. In order to help you better understand this campus resource, I interviewed Joanne Snapp, the Director of Health Professions Advising. Joanne was kind enough to answer the following questions:

  1. What is the mission and what are the core values of Health Professions Advising?

The Office of Health Professions Advising serves all UC Davis undergraduates, graduate students, and alumni pursuing any health profession or allied health field.  Advisers use a holistic approach while providing support and feedback during academic and application preparation. We encourage students to be proactive and reflective during their career decision-making. Our goal is for students to become successful applicants who demonstrate compassion, leadership and a commitment to academic success throughout their journey toward a health professions career.

  1. What do you hope that students get out of utilizing Health Professions Advising?

I hope that pre-health students will feel supported when pursuing whatever health field they choose. I hope they trust the office as a reliable resource for accurate information and honest feedback. My goal is for each student to reach their career goal, but also to be realistic and reflective when making those decisions.

  1. What types of students should seek Health Professions Advising?

Health Professions Advising is for any student seeking a career in a health or allied health field, including veterinary medicine.

  1. When during their undergraduate careers do you recommend that students look into Health Professions Advising?

Students should begin attending HPA events as soon as they realize they may be interested in a health field. At the beginning of each quarter, I offer first year and second year class meetings. The sooner a student begins attending their class meeting, the better. I will cover all of the basics and more about being successful on this journey. Each meeting builds upon the next. I try to offer a presentation every day so that students have plenty of opportunities to come ask questions.

5. Is there a website or a Facebook page that students can visit to access all of the different Health Professions Advising resources?

Students should visit https://www.facebook.com/healthprofessionsadvising and/or http://hpa.ucdavis.edu/


 

sciences_laboratory_building
Sciences Lab Building

As you can see, HPA provides a wealth of both information and support in order to help students gain the tools necessary to succeed in reaching their career goals.

If you like what you hear so far, you may schedule an appointment via email: HealthProfessionsAdvising@ucdavis.edu.

If you have any questions you may call: 754-9256.

Additionally, the HPA office is located in 1011 Sciences Lab Building.

Also, keep your eyes peeled for upcoming events hosted by HPA throughout the quarter. Each quarter is filled with events such as meet and greets, small group advising, webinars, seminars that focus on different majors or professions, and many more! As Joanne mentioned, these are available for all undergraduate students, including transfer students, as well as graduate students, and alumni. You can keep yourself updated on these upcoming events through the Facebook page mentioned above.

Take care.

Daiana Bucio

BASC Peer Adviser

3rd year Genetics and Genomics major

 

Resource Spotlight: Student Community Center

SCC1

The UC Davis campus has a vast variety of campus resources readily available to students. One such resource is the Student Community Center (SCC) which provides academic services and other diverse organizations that create an all-inclusive environment for our students. Located in the center of the main UCD campus, the SCC is home to organizations such as: the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, Asexual Resource Center (LGBTQIARC), Student Recruitment and Retention Center (SRRC), Cross Cultural Center (CCC), McNair Scholars Program, Women’s Resources and Research Center (WRRC), AB540 and Undocumented Student Center, and Undergraduate Research Center (URC). The SCC also has a few meeting and study rooms available for reservations.

A little on what each of these centers is about:

LGBTQIA Resource Center– The LQBTQIA Resource Center is open to all students. One of the center’s main focuses is to provide students with resources in the areas of programming, advising, and education. There are many resources and programs available for student involvement as well as events throughout the year that anyone can attend. For example: LGBTQIARC hosts Wii Wednesdays and Crafternoons so stop by for some fun! The center is open Monday – Thursday, 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM and Fridays 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM; drop by for questions or if you simply need a place to study.

lgbtrc-front

Student Recruitment and Retention Center- The SRCC is a student resource center that stands for educational equity. Some services include peer mentoring, academic support, transfer student support, leadership development, and more. The SRCC also has great opportunities for students to get involved whether through their programs, events, volunteer and internship programs, or jobs. For example, are you a transfer student? If so you may wish to attend the SRRC’s weekly Transfer Hour every Wednesday from 2-4pm in their SCC conference room.

lounge srrc

Cross Cultural Center- Interested in learning about people? How about cultures other than your own? If so, pay a visit to the CCC. Like all other centers the CCC has programs and volunteer and job opportunities for students to get involved. The CCC has a goal of creating a campus community in which all individuals share a harmonious environment free of sexism, racism, xenophobia, or any other form of oppression. One unique aspect of the CCC is the Culture Days that it puts together for communities within our campus. This is a time for students to express their culture to others and in turn learn about others’ culture as well.

Office_Panorama_banner ccc

McNair Scholars Program- The McNair Scholar Program serves to encourage students in graduate programs from underrepresented backgrounds to pursue doctoral degrees. For more information visit the McNair Scholar Program website.

Women’s Resources and Research Center- The WRRC works to promote gender equality through intersectional feminist approaches. This center welcomes people of all genders and provides all with a variety of involvement opportunities ranging from leadership program positions to gender research. The WRRC also provides students with an extensive list of resources that are essential for any situation in need of advise or involving distress.  One unique aspect of the WRRC is their Joy Fergoda Library. Located in North Hall, the Joy Fergoda Library houses over 12,000 books and films promoting feminist research and scholarship at UC Davis; a Forum on Disabilities Collection is also available.

NorthHall wrrc
The WRRC extends to both North Hall and the SCC. Available at the SCC is the WRRC Community Office

AB540 and Undocumented Student Center-  This center seeks to help students reach their academic goals while helping students overcome any legal and financial obstacles. The goal of this center is to create a safe and welcoming environment in which resources like mentoring are available, and also academic guidance and financial opportunities.

Undergraduate Research Center- Looking for research experience but do not know where to begin? Visiting the Undergraduate Research Center may be a good start. The URC works to help students develop skills necessary for research positions. It also provides students with resources needed to find research opportunities. Every year, the URC hosts an annual Undergraduate Research Conference where students are given the opportunity for present their research. For more information about programs, their Genius 5K run/walk, conference, and awards visit the Undergraduate Research Center website or visit the center on the second floor of the SCC.

With its bright colors, murals, and lively environment, the SCC is an inviting place for students. Even studying becomes appealing with the comfortable chairs in the study lounge. The SCC is a convenient center which hosts what seems to be a plethora of resources located all in one area. Connected to the SCC there is also the CoHo South Cafe. Coffee + Resources + Study Area = Happy Students. Pay the SCC a visit; it is a great campus resource!

SCC study loungeAlejandra Villa
Academic Peer Adviser
3rd Year Genetics and Genomics Major