Minoring/Double Majoring with CBS: Tips, Tricks, and Reasons to Do It

For this post, I thought I would cover a somewhat daunting topic that I am well-acquainted with – the minor/double major option. I hope to illuminate some of the many reasons people have for minoring, different perspectives on why it can be beneficial, and other tips on how to best plan for these when pursuing a major in the College of Biological Sciences.

Just for some personal context, I am currently pursuing a double major in Evolution, Ecology, and Biodiversity (EEB) and Spanish. While I initially only committed myself to a minor in Spanish, I was able to make a double major work with some finessing and willingness to take a few Summer courses. I was also able to skip a good amount of prerequisite coursework due to taking AP Spanish in High School — which was a fortunate happenstance that has helped make double majoring possible for me. While some majors with smaller unit requirements may be feasible to do alongside a CBS major, it does take a lot of planning and is made most possible with planning earlier in your undergraduate career and by closely coordinating with academic advisers. On the other hand, pursuing a minor does take some planning, but is much more feasible for most STEM majors as well as transfer students who may have too few quarters for making a double major happen. With this in mind, I will mostly be addressing the prospect of minoring, but please take note that with the right mindset, some early planning, and some gumption, double majoring may also be possible! These are just a few things to consider as we move forward.

So, let’s get started on the different motives and benefits of minoring…

 

1 – Making the Most of Your GEs — A well-known truth about CBS is that our college is somewhat deficient in Arts and Humanities (AH) and Social Science (SS) courses. Thus, the 32 units of AH and SS courses needed for the General Education requirement are generally not associated with your major course material. That is approximately 8 courses outside of your major that you can dedicate to a minor! A minor is generally a few courses of lower division prerequisite material and around 20-24 units (5-6 courses)

fms
One of my favorite non-Spanish GE courses at Davis was an introduction to Film Studies. We studied the advent of moving pictures in the late 1800s up to the early years of the Golden Age of Hollywood cinema.

of upper division ‘depth’ coursework — making it wholly feasible to utilize for completing your GEs, which are already a necessary degree requirement. What better way to make the most of your GEs than to do a minor and earn yourself an additional credential? This is something I planned out with my Spanish adviser, as there are some specific or niche GE requirements that only specific Spanish courses would cover. Make sure to check in with your advisers to find out when certain courses are offered in order to best plan for this!

 

2 – Balancing Your Course Load — One of the biggest issues people run into while pursuing STEM degrees is the sheer amount of heavy science coursework they have to take at once. Being able to use minor courses as ‘buffers’ is a really helpful tool in preventing mental strain and maintaining your overall wellness. While partaking in

balance
“Problems arise in that one has to find a balance between what people need from you and what you need for yourself.” – Jessye Norman

extracurriculars and making time for your hobbies is great in theory, it is often easy to put off these sorts of things due to academic and personal stress. In my own circumstance, I found that committing myself to Spanish helped to ensure this balance throughout my academic career. In the best possible way, it forced me to prioritize something aside from science that I greatly enjoy, which has substantially enhanced my college experience as a whole.

 

3 – Standing Out/Becoming More Multifaceted — When considering increasingly competitive work positions or graduate/health-related programs, it feels impossible to capture yourself on paper in a way that truly reflects your identity and individuality. Completing a unique minor is just one way to differentiate yourself. This is something that can help you both directly and indirectly. For instance, it can be both help with how you appear to someone reviewing physical applications and it can also be helpful as a

How-stand-out-crowd
Another way to stand out in the professional world…

point of interest to connect with an interviewer or colleague. Aside from appearances, minors are especially helpful in broadening your horizons, expanding your comfort zone, or building upon your skill set to make you a more well-rounded candidate for any position. Whether you minor in something more practical, like Communications, or something of a more personal interest, like Art History, both can help build your professional versatility and extend the scope of your academic experience.

4 – An Increasing Professional Gray Area — Modern-day careers are no longer nearly as rigid and linear as they used to be. Not only are there more and more spliced careers being established within the gray area between different fields, but there are also increasing numbers of STEM majors pursuing careers outside of STEM, such as law, etc. Some minor programs might help prepare you for navigating the gray area between

head-professional-careers
“I translate science to the bureaucrats and politicians and translate the bureaucracy to the scientists.” – Nancy Kingsbury

different career paths as you work to found yourself professionally. However, you do not necessarily need a minor for this and there are also many meaningful extracurricular opportunities that might be equally helpful in working toward this goal.

 

5 – Studying Abroad — Arguably one of the most straightforward reasons for pursuing a minor is the possibility of studying abroad. While this is not a required part of most

copacabana rio
One of the Study Abroad 2018 Photo Contest candidates — Welcoming the New Year in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (by Ricardo Martinez)

minors, this can often be more easily incorporated into culturally or linguistically focused minors when compared to STEM majors. While there are some specific programs that help students complete STEM courses abroad or partake in health or research opportunities while abroad, these are not looked at as being nearly as ‘necessary,’ and so they are generally less promoted. For more information on these opportunities, I recommend dropping into the Study Abroad Center.

 

6 – (Last, but not least…) Uncertainty and Curiosity — It is completely normal and quite common for students to not have a concrete idea of what career they would like to pursue after they graduate. I think that, as students here, most of us have probably seen a friend or two have a change of heart about their studies or the future career they want for themselves. With this in mind, it is important to recognize that a person’s major does

two roads diverged
Exploring the paths before you…

not limit their career prospects upon graduation, as people often end up in careers largely unrelated to what they studied for their undergraduate. Will trade schools are geared toward training you for a specific line of work, an academic career at a university is meant to foster the exploration of ideas rather than limiting you to a narrow path. For those of us undertaking unit-dense majors in Biological Sciences, the space for exploration is a bit more limited, but if you make the most of your GEs and plan accordingly, minoring is not out of reach.

 

My advice on how to make a minor work for you will be highly unoriginal: make alternate plans, seek out advising, and be flexible. I personally love to make alternate academic plans to be able to see what my options are so that I can ensure that my future quarters will be well-balanced. In planning ahead, I have also been able to make space for research and extracurricular opportunities. I have been able to identify potential problems early on and avoid a lot of complications by reviewing my plans with both my EEB and Spanish advisers. Some issues I had were unavoidable and that’s where it was so important for me to be flexible and willing to take a summer session to keep things on track.

I hope that this post gives you some food for thought as you continue your academic journey and helps you to explore the options before you.

PETRA SILVERMAN

BASC PEER ADVISOR

4TH YEAR – EVOLUTION, ECOLOGY, AND BIODIVERSITY + SPANISH MAJOR

Advertisements

Founding Your Path: An Interview with Dr. Graham Coop

Welcome back, Aggies! Winter quarter is now in full swing, bringing tons of rain along with it. As we tend to spend a bit more time indoors in winter, it is often a great time for planning ahead and reflecting on the opportunities and paths before us. In our reflecting, it is likely that many of us will experience some frustration and uncertainty in  choosing career and life paths; whether it be about our academics, research, internships, or other long-term plans. While the internet might help in building a pros and cons list (the logical side of decision making), ultimately we have to choose our paths from our heart (what FEELS right). In order to shed some light on the prospect of choosing our own paths, I decided to interview Dr. Graham Coop, a Professor from the Center for Population Biology here at Davis. I chose to interview Dr. Coop in an attempt to capture the journey that led him to a career that he is clearly passionate about (If you have the opportunity to take one of his evolution/genetics classes, you’ll see what I mean).


coopgraham14291
Dr. Graham Coop
https://biology.ucdavis.edu/people/graham-coop

I asked Dr. Coop to start with his high school years, inquiring about what interests he had back then. To my surprise, Dr. Coop replied, “I didn’t particularly like what we’d call ‘secondary school’ in the UK. I wasn’t particularly good at it… and I wasn’t even totally sure I was going to go to university. I didn’t get particularly good grades and I barely made it into my safety school.” In the end however, he attended the University of Reading and decided to study physics.

 

In reflecting upon his undergraduate years and transition to college, Dr. Coop continued, “I think it was nice for me to be somewhere different … there are points in your life where you get to change the sort of groups of people you’re hanging out with, and you sort of move to a group of people who don’t know you and don’t have expectations of you … that was really important for me.” While the overall undergraduate experience seemed positive, Dr. Coop distinctly remembered struggling during his first year of his undergraduate experience.  At this point, he and I shared experiences regarding the difficulties that come along with the first year adjustment period. Around the end of his first year, he met with a faculty mentor, where he resolved to try working harder in his academics. In describing this first major turning point, Dr. Coop exclaimed,  “I don’t know what happened, but something clicked and I started to do better.” By graduation, he had one of the highest marks in his class.

During his undergraduate years, he had initially wanted to become a Physicist, though in hindsight, Coop admits to not fully realizing what all a career as a Physicist would entail. While doing some soul searching, he had a conversation about career paths with one of his physics professors. Coop expressed having interest in mathematics and computers, but he was not certain in which career path he could apply these skills to. It was in talking to his professor that Coop slightly changed course as he began considering the realm of biology. As a result of his aptitudes, the professor recommended that he look into mathematical biology, as there are so many complex problems within biology that require mathematical analysis in order to solve them.

That discussion with his physics professor had one of the most profound impacts on his career.  As Dr. Coop recalled, “That was just really wonderful advice and something which really changed the direction I was going in when I’d never really thought about it before.”  Having already been intrigued by biological concepts, such as evolution, Coop became excited to continue developing new skills and apply the knowledge he gained in his undergraduate studies. He went on to receive his PhD in Statistical Genetics at the University of Oxford; then he continued as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Chicago in Human Genetics. From there, he was accepted as a professor here at UC Davis.

In reflecting upon his story, it was clear to see how some of the most important moments of growth occurred with the help of university faculty and professors. Coop expressed how important it was for him to talk with people who helped him see where he could apply his skills and interests. When I asked Dr. Coop what advice he had for students after reflecting back on his own experiences, he wanted to encourage students to “think broadly” about what they want to do, be open to different paths that come their way, and to take advantage of diverse or unexpected opportunities. People often get caught up with having a linear academic plan leading to a precise career, not wanting to stray from their intended path or explore other routes. Coop explained that there are numerous ways for people to create fulfilling journeys and exciting career opportunities to apply their diverse skills. Undoubtedly, having  an open mind was an integral component in each step of the way along his life journey.

When I asked for any final words of wisdom he had for Davis undergraduates, he paused for a moment and stated the following:

“Try to be brave about trying new things when you’re at university … It’s a good time to learn to push yourself and figure out where your limits are. You have the room to actually explore what you want to do … It’s a really valuable time to do that. You’ll probably find that your comfort zone is a lot broader than you think it is when you actually start stepping outside of it.”

One of the fundamental messages I took from my interview with Dr. Coop was about how nonlinear and nonconventional our paths truly are. I hope that this interview offers you a unique perspective, helps you to embrace some of the change and uncertainty of your college years, and inspires you to take chances as you establish your own path.

Petra Silverman
BASC Peer Advisor
4th Year – Evolution, Ecology, and Biodiversity + Spanish major

 

Making a Four-Year Plan

Pass 1 for Winter 2016 is coming up. Some of you may already have a beautiful schedule lined up and some of you may still be frantically searching for classes to take, feeling lost and anxious. Whichever individual you are at the moment, you should seriously consider making a rough four-year plan or revising one you already have. Creating a four-year plan can seem daunting, time consuming, and unnecessary; however, in the long run your academic life will be much easier with a pre-planned schedule. Think about all those pass times that you won’t have to stress over! For many of you, creating a four-year plan may mean making life defining decisions such as: Should I go to Medical School? Will I be taking a gap year before work? Do I want to change my major? Am I finally going to minor in Spanish like I said I would?  Our recommendation is: make a plan now and don’t be afraid to change it along the way! Here are some simple steps to get started.

 

  • FRUSTRATEDKIDTalk to An Adviser (Or Multiple) 

Not sure where to begin when planning your future? When in doubt, don’t hesitate to make an appointment with your major adviser or come by during drop-in hours  to see a peer adviser. Trained professionals are available to give you the know how’s and the what’s ups to making an academic plan.

What about Double Majoring?

Finishing a double major at UC Davis requires tactful and strategic arranging of classes and definitely, lots of planning. When making a plan be sure to visit the advisers of both majors you intend to finish.

Thinking About Minoring?

Finishing one minor or even multiple minors is a great way to broaden your academic experience. Most minors require roughly 20 units; it’s also important to check for prerequisites and other minute details. For more information, talk to an adviser for the college or department you plan on minoring in.

Planning on Going to Professional School?NorthHall-Large

For many of you, applying to college won’t be the last time you needed to write a personal statement; find teachers for letters of recommendations; take a standardized exam; and ensure you fulfill all the prerequisites for your future dream school. This is where a four-year plan can really help you reach your professional dreams and make sure you fulfill all prerequisites, GE’s, and university/major requirements before you graduate. Applying to professional school is indeed difficult, but thankfully there are trained advisers available to guide you through the application process. Visit UC Davis’ Pre-Graduate/Professional Advising in 111 South Hall or go to 1011 SLB to talk to a Pre-Health Professions Adviser \

  • Make a List of Prospective Classes  

So, you’ve already seen your major adviser and you’re on track to graduate–Great! The next thing to do is incorporate interesting and/or relevant classes into your four-year plan. Exploring the General Catalog is a great place to begin, as it contains all the major/minor requirements, a list of all the GE’s offered on campus. Tip: The letters and numerals you see here:  QL, SE, SL, VL.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) These tell you what GE’s the class fulfills and also the quarter that class is offered. (I. means fall, II. means winter, and III. means spring)                                                               You can also narrow down your search using Schedule Builder’s Advanced Options. Extra Tip: Jot these classes down into a planner or into your computer so you can access them later.

 

  • Sit Down and Actually Make a Plan planning baby

So, you’ve more or less decided on a career and have compiled a list of interesting classes–you’re ready to start planning! Be sure to allocate a time block of a few hours to sit down infront of a computer and churn out a four-year plan. Many students like to use Excel but we also recommend using Oasis‘s Academic Plan form.    Such a form can be found under the Forms and Petitions Tab on Oasis. When plugging and chugging the classes you want to take, be sure to consider a few things…

Fulfill Prerequisites:

Most upper-division major requirements have prerequisite classes, and it is important to make sure you’ve filled in all your prerequisite courses before putting in your major classes. Not having the right prerequisites could result in being dropped from the class or being unprepared for the course, so be sure to take a look in the General Catalog or on Schedule Builder for specific details.

Consider SS1 or SS2: 

UC Davis offers a large majority of major classes during the summer, and students tend to perform better in classes taken during the summer time. Instead of spreading yourself thin with multiple classes, you can focus all your efforts on one class! If you want to get ahead of your schedule or take a load off of your normal academic quarter, definitely plan on taking a class or two in the summer. It’s important to plan ahead so that you can talk to the Financial Aid Office regarding your financial needs or make vacation plans with friends and family.

Make Time for Studying Abroad: abroad

Did you know students can take BIS 101 in Europe every summer? This is just one example of the many classes and places students can explore with the Study Abroad Program. Studying abroad is usually the experience of a lifetime, but there may be a lot of hoops to jump through before actually going abroad. That is why it is important to have a plan, so you have time to prepare documents and figure out living expenses.

Whether or not you’ve decided on a future career, it never hurts to make a four-year plan and then change it as life goes forward. Life happens and your plans may be uncertain; however, a four-year plan may elucidate certain fuzzy details about the future, and set you on the right track to success!

Happy Planning!

Melissa Li                                                                                                                         Class of 2016  Biological Sciences, Emphasis in Neurology, Physiology, and Behavior                                                Biology Academic Success–Peer Adviser

Staying On Top Of Things-A Guide To First Year Living Off Campus

With the current academic year coming to a close and move-in day to your new apartment getting closer, it is time to prepare for the big move. Moving to an off-campus apartment is such an exciting time; you are living on your own! But…you are living on your own, which means new responsibilities.

Moving away from home into the dorms is a big step, however, highly convenient.  Living in the dorms you are on campus, you are living right next to the wonderful Dining Commons, and you do not have to do any chores! All of this changes once you move to an off-campus apartment: You are no longer on campus, the Dining Commons is not within convenient reach, and yes, you guessed it, you will have chores to take care of. Although moving into your own apartment comes with extra responsibilities, it is easy to make the best out of it by being prepared for what is to come.

Think about time. Living off campus requires extra planning with respect to time. It is important to give extra consideration to travel time when living off-campus; how will you get to campus? Bus, walk, bike, drive? If you prefer taking the bus, begin familiarizing yourself with the bus schedule. It is nice to already know the bus schedule so you do not miss the bus and are late to class. There is also a great UC Davis Mobile App that has the Unitrans schedule for reference. One thing that may be helpful at the beginning of each quarter is to review your class schedule and plan which bus to take so you get to campus with plenty of time to get to class on time. Unitrans is free to all UC Davis students as long as they show a student ID. Similarly, if you choose to walk, bike, or drive (parking permit is required) to campus, leave with enough time so you are not late.
A lot of the time this means waking up extra early!

What happens when you are on campus and have a break between your classes? Do you go home? Do you stay on campus? It is much more time costly to go home between breaks. Going home decreases productivity levels. Chances are you will go home and by the time you get home there is no time to get some good studying done before you have to go back to campus (unless you have a 3+ hour gap). It is encouraged to stay on campus and use this time to study. Begin looking for a favorite study spot on campus, somewhere you are comfortable and can concentrate.

What about food? No more Dining Commons? Well, not necessarily. Even if you are not living in the Residence Halls one can still purchase meal plans and you can do so by following these directions online. If you wish to not purchase a meal plan and plan to prepare your own meals by cooking at home then great! Cooking your own meals has some great advantages: you can cook whatever you wish, staying healthy is easier, and this is a great way to improve cooking skills (I encourage you to also read our “A Healthy Balanced Diet” blog for tips on ways to stay healthy). On campus there is also the Silo and Memorial Union with a variety of food choices.

Do I hear you asking about resources outside of the residence halls? There are a plethora of campus resources available to you scattered throughout our campus. Once you no longer live in the residence halls, the Academic Advising Centers may not be the most convenient place for you. Your first, and most important academic advising resource should be your Dean’s Office. Each college has their own Dean’s Office:

College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences
150 Mrak Hall

College of Biological Sciences
Biology Academic Success Center
1023 Sciences Laboratory Building

College of Engineering
1050 Kemper Hall

College of Letters and Science
200 Social Sciences and Humanities Building

Aside from your respective Dean’s Office, there are plenty other resources available to you. For a bit of information on a few resources available I encourage you to read our Resource Highlight blogs on Health Professions Advising, the Student Community Center, and the Student Academic Success Center. The Center For student Involvement is also a great resources to use to stay connected on campus, get involved in a club, or join an intramural sport; there is plenty to choose from.  Fear not, there are even more resources available to you, do not be afraid to do a little research!

Best of luck!

Alejandra Villa
3rd year Genetics and Genomics major
Biology Academic Success Center Peer Adviser

Career Spotlight: Anatomist

Do you enjoy studying the form and structure of animal bodies?  Are you interested in performing systematic observations and dissections of muscles, tissues, and organs? Where you fascinated with the make up of the human body when you took CHA 101/EXB 106? If so, a career as an Anatomist may be a great fit!

What is an Anatomist?

According to schoolsintheusa.com, an Anatomist is someone who specializes in the body structure of organisms, and has played an important role in the research and discovery of organisms and their function for centuries. A career as an Anatomist can be very rewarding, because it allows you to explore what is normally hidden from view and discover how structure relates to function. There are a variety of different systems Anatomists can specialize in depending on their interests. Some examples of these include the endocrine system, lymphatic system, cardiovascular system, and skeletal system.

Anatomists also specialize in different species other than the human body depending on their field of work. Because the structures of most mammalian bodies have many similarities, Anatomists will typically draw inferences from existing knowledge to discover new purposes for the existing structure of species and their organs.

The following is a list of typical tasks an Anatomist regularly performs:

  • Examine large organs and organ systems through dissection
  • Examine smaller structures such as tissues and cells using a microscope
  • Compare structures across different species
  • Utilize knowledge on the structural form of organisms to solve medical problems

What type of education do Anatomists have?

An Anatomist will typically have a Bachelor’s degree in Biology, Chemistry, or any related field to biological, physical, or behavioral science. A masters degree in Anatomy is required to then work in a laboratory or for a private company. Most Anatomists also go on to earn a Doctoral degree to get a research or teaching position at a university or medical school.

Where do Anatomists work?

There are many different areas Anatomists can work. Most Anatomists either teach or do research in universities or medical centers where they help train scientists or various health care workers such as physicians, nurses, dentists, and pharmacists. Others may be employed by private companies, governmental agencies, or scientific publishing firms. Anatomists therefore spend most of their time in laboratories or class rooms, and must be flexible with working alone or as part of a team.

Salary:

Salary depends on the education of the Anatomist, and according to the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics the average pay is $75,160, and there is an expected 13% increase in employment.

Additional Resources:

There are various Graduate Programs in Anatomy across the country. You can explore these options to choose a program that best fits your interests and career goals. Here is a summary of the resources used in this blog to help you gather more information on becoming an Anatomist:

Hopefully this spotlight on becoming an Anatomist has peaked your interest or helped you identify some of your career goals. Good luck!

Zoe Lim
BASC Peer Adviser
Biological Sciences Major

 

The Many Advantages of Summer Sessions

Spring quarter is off in full swing and it is time to start looking ahead and thinking about summer plans. Many of you may be excited to get some rest and relaxation, or to just get out of Davis for an adventure. Although these all sound very enticing, remember that Summer Sessions is a great option. Whether you are looking to get ahead, catch up on units, or take a challenging major course, the advantages of enrolling in Summer Sessions are plentiful. To peak your interest in staying in Davis to take classes this summer, I will share my experience with Summer Sessions in the following paragraphs.

It was Spring quarter during my second year at Davis, and I had just taken Physics 7B. Physics proved to be challenging to me compared to other courses, so I began thinking about taking it as soon after Physics 7B as I could. After sitting down and mapping out my third and fourth year classes, I realized taking Physics would not only clear up my schedule but help me concentrate on other challenging courses that I was planning to take during fall quarter of my third year, like NPB 101 and BIS 101. My next decision was whether or not to take Session 1 or Session 2. I wanted to take Session 1 because I felt it would be good to take Physics 7C right after having taken 7B, with only a couple of weeks separating the two rather than a couple months. However I felt pretty drained from Spring quarter and I ultimately decided that Session 2 would be best because it would give my mind a break and I could come back ready to learn in the beginning of August.  I also realized that many of my friends from home that were going to semester schools would be going back to school around August too, so I would not feel like I was ending my summer early.

Summer session 2 was fast-paced to say the least. Although I was only taking Physics 7C and a GE course,  I had to constantly study in order to keep up with the work. However, I found it much easier to do so when I only had two classes to concentrate on because the material was constantly being reinforced. This, along with the fact that I was able to go to my professor’s office hours because I had a more open schedule, is why I was able to have a remarkably better learning outcome in Physics 7C than I had with Physics 7B when I took it during the regular quarter. I was also really happy to finish classes in 6 weeks rather than 10 weeks!


Although Summer Session at UC Davis may not be your first idea when it comes to making summer plans here is a short list of the advantages of taking Summer Sessions:

  • Improve your UC cumulative GPA
  • Work towards reaching minimum progress
  • Take prerequisite courses for graduate school
  • Clear up a packed schedule by taking some classes in the summer
  • Benefit from concentrating on less classes
  • Summer session is only six weeks
  • Have more time to explore the city of Davis!

When registering for Summer Session classes, be sure to keep a balanced schedule during each session. This means you should avoid taking two science classes together during one session due to the time constraints and rigor of of science courses.

There has been an important update to financial aid for Summer Session. It will now be awarded based on the earliest date that you are registered or wait-listed in at least 6 units total over the whole summer. For example, if you only wanted to enroll in one session, you would need a minimum of 6 units. But, if you wanted to take both sessions, you would need a minimum of 6 units total for both summer sessions. Also, be on the look out for Summer Sessions pass times coming out April 27th!

 

Have a great Summer Session and good luck!

Zoe Lim

Biological Sciences

BASC Peer Adviser

 

Decision time!

Congratulations on making it this far! This is such an exciting time- you are getting to choose where you will spend the next four years of your life!

For me, the decision was actually very clear and deep down I knew I would end up choosing UC Davis, but I am such an indecisive person that it took a lot of going back and forth for me to actually commit to going to UC Davis, (I think I signed my Intent to Register on the very last day). I initially thought of UC Davis as “the school off I-80 that is on the way to Tahoe” but after my first visit I began to associate it as an exciting school with a gorgeous campus, big egg heads, and cute and fun downtown. I began to form this opinion of UC Davis during a school field trip in 7th grade on my first college tour. I have a clear picture of walking along the arboretum, sitting on the quad, and walking through the very exciting and busy Memorial Union on that sunny Spring day. I remember having a great time on the trip and really liking that atmosphere. I knew there were many wonderful things about UC Davis, mainly that it was a great science school, and so I began to start picturing myself as a UC Davis student.

When I found out I was accepted, I was very excited because I knew a few people who had gone to school at UC Davis and I always heard positive things from them. My parents had also told me great things about UC Davis, saying that it was one of the last “true college towns.” When they told me this I had no idea what that meant, but after spending four years living in Davis and getting to compare it to other schools, I now know that this is true. Taking a stroll in downtown Davis will allow you to experience the sense of community centered around the school and the excitement about events happening in both the school and the town. Most people that live in Davis seem to be affiliated with the University in some way and are always happy to speak to students and offer advice, which for me was a very positive factor because I really wanted to go to a school with a welcoming and hospitable environment.

I can empathize with many of you who are weighing different factors and trying to decide between your options. An important factor for deciding is thinking about yourself and the type of person you are, and trying to match which school will offer you the most opportunities to succeed both academically and socially. With this in mind, remember that UC Davis has SO MANY different resources and opportunities for a wide variety of students to get involved and feel included in academics and the campus community. Here is a brief list of these resources and opportunities:

Good luck and I hope you are all future Aggies!

Zoe Lim
Peer Adviser
Biology Academic Success Center
Biological Sciences, Class of 2015