Internships

As your first year at Davis is coming to an end, have you been thinking about finding an internship? UC Davis offers many internships (i.e. health, business, design, government, law, etc.) so there is always something for everyone. Some ask “will an internship be worth my time”? To make life easier, I listed four reasons (even though there are many more) why internships are beneficial and why you should participate in an internship!

First: The Experience! Wouldn’t  it be nice to have an inside look into your future career before fully committing to that career? Internships help you find the right career fit, and allow you to test drive before investing your time and money into a career you may not even enjoy. For example, let’s say you want to become a physician. If you do an internship at a hospital or clinic, you will be able to observe and work alongside a physician, which allows to you see an in-depth look of what really goes on outside of the classroom.

Second: Networking!  Internships provide opportunities to network. You get the opportunity to form close bonds between your colleagues and supervisors, who can eventually become your mentors or write you letters of recommendation. If you are planning on applying for positions where you are interning, you are much more likely to be hired as you are a familiar face and already have relationships with the staff. The internship experience looks great on applications because it will show that you have related experience and are therefore highly qualified for the position.

Third: Develop New Skills! Everyone can benefit from building new skills. Internships teach you many things, not only the in and outs of the field you are interning in but also other transferable skills such as improved interpersonal communication, working on a team, and/or expressing empathy.

Fourth: Earn Course Credits and/or Transcript Notation! Yes, you heard right, not only do you get to earn experience, opportunities, and new skills from internships but you may also earn UNITS and/or the internship appears on your transcript, which is managed through ICC. It is a win-win for everyone. Many students take advantage of this opportunity during the summer because there are fewer students at UC Davis and to be considered a full-time student and to be qualified for financial aid a student must be enrolled in a minimum of six units.

I have been involved in many internships and can say that I learned something from each one. Each internship was a wonderful experience that provided a different view on my future career. Through the internships, I learned what I am passionate about as well as things that I knew were not a right fit for me. Remember if you are applying to an internship you have to start the process the quarter/summer before you get involved. Step out of your comfort zone and get involved as soon as you can! There are tons of internships available and if you are interested in an internship that we do not offer, the staff at the Internship and Career Center (ICC) will try their best to get you an internship you like. Visit the Internship and Career Center in South Hall today!

Rufa Pazyuk
BASC Peer Advisor
Fourth Year: Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior and Religious Studies Double Major

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UC Davis Student-Run Clinics – How do I join?

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Are you looking for a fun clinical experience? Do you want to give back to the community? Are you looking to build relationships with patients, medical students, and healthcare professionals?

If you answered YES to any of the questions above, the UC Davis Student-Run Clinics may be just for you!

For more than 35 years, the UC Davis student-run clinics have provided free health care services to the uninsured, low-income, and underserved populations within the Sacramento community. Each clinic was established by UC Davis undergraduate and medical students who sought to provide culturally sensitive care to community members who lacked access to basic healthcare. This program serves thousands of patients every year and gives medical students and undergraduates the unique opportunity to learn first-hand about the challenges and rewards of patient care and community medicine.

I joined the Bayanihan Clinic back in the winter of 2014. As a young and naive freshman, I was anxious but eager to get involved on campus. I didn’t know where to get started, but then I saw a flyer for the Bayanihan Clinic’s information session posted on the Wellman Hall bulletin board. “Why not apply? What do I have to lose?” I thought. Four years later, I can easily say that joining the Bayanihan Clinic was the most rewarding experience of my undergraduate career. I learned how to accurately take vitals, to read lab results, and to present a patient case to the precepting physician. I also built strong relationships with peers and patients and received helpful advice from medical students and physicians about the medical school application process.

So, what are the clinics looking for in potential applicants?
Each clinic is unique and has certain qualities that it values most in its volunteers. However, all the clinics look for the following traits in potential applicants:
1) Interest in their specific community – There are 10 different clinics that you could potentially apply for. So, why do you prefer Clinic A over Clinic B? Do you have a genuine interest in serving this clinic’s patient population? It is important to show in your application and interview that you understand WHO the clinic serves and why you are personally invested in working with this group.
2) Desire to be a patient advocate – Our patients come first. We strive to provide culturally and linguistically sensitive care to individuals who lack access to basic healthcare. We want our patients to feel comfortable coming to us for help. In your application/interview, you want to convince the committee that you will be a passionate advocate for its patients.
3) Leadership – Every clinic wants to ensure that their doors remain open for many years. Therefore, the application/interview committee looks for applicants that they believe are capable of filling future leadership roles (i.e. coordinator, officer, etc.). In addition, the clinics are constantly growing and pushing to improve patient care by providing more specialized services to their patients. Can you lead a new program? Do you have a vision that you hope to see implemented in a clinic?
4) Teamwork – Every clinic functions as a team. Each week, you will work with a team of undergraduate and medical students, and health professionals to provide quality care to patients. Can you work efficiently as a member of this team? Are you willing to listen to your peers and mentors and accept constructive criticism? Are you willing to contribute to new projects and programs that the clinic implements?

I highly encourage all students to apply for the clinics. It doesn’t matter if you are interested in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, etc., there is a perfect match for you! I found my home at the Bayanihan Clinic. Where will you find yours?

Here is a list of all 10 UC Davis Student-Run Clinics. Follow the links to learn more about how you can get involved!

Bayanihan Clinic
The Bayanihan Clinic serves the underserved and uninsured Filipino population in the Greater Sacramento area, specifically the Filipino WWII veterans and immigrants. They provide women’s health and dermatology services, and diabetes education through their Diabetes Empowerment Program.  Their next application cycle will open in January 2017.

Clinica Tepatí
Clinica Tepati provides primary care services to the underserved Latino community in Sacramento. Their new Diabetes Interest Group is designed to educate patients about diabetes and how best to manage their care.  Their next application cycle will open in Spring 2017.

Imani Clinic
Imani Clinic provides basic healthcare services to the underserved Oak Park community with the target population being African Americans within the community. It’s goal is to provide culturally sensitive care and to foster early and lasting relationships between students, healthcare professionals, and the community. Their next application cycle will open in Spring 2017.

Joan Viteri Memorial Clinic (JVMC)
JVMC serves the healthcare needs of uninsured IV drug users, sex workers, transsexuals and their families in the Sacramento county. JVMC acts as an intervention service, reaching out to patients before their conditions drain limited ER resources, pose a public health hazard, or become fatal to the patient. Their next application cycle will open in April 2017.

Knight’s Landing One-Health Clinic
Knight’s Landing One-Health Clinic provides linguistically competent and culturally sensitive health care services to the rural underserved, particularly women, adolescents and farmworkers. In partnership with the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, veterinary services are available at the clinic on the third Sunday of each month. Their application cycle is open now and applications are due in April 2017.

Paul Hom Asian Clinic
The Paul Hom Asian Clinic primarily serves the uninsured and immigrant Southeast Asian communities in Sacramento. This clinic provides offers free primary care services and hosts specialty clinics that include: psychiatry, dermatology, ophthalmology, cardiopulmonary, and musculoskeletal. Their next application cycle opens in Spring 2017.

VN Cares
VN CARES is a student-run clinic that promotes cancer awareness and provides free cancer screenings to the underserved Vietnamese population. The clinic’s long term goal is to reduce cancer-related disparities in the Vietnamese community. This clinic has two internship positions available to undergraduate students: (1) Clinical Internship and (2) Research and Education Internship. Their application cycle is currently closed. 

Hmong Lifting Underserved Barriers (HLUB)
The HLUB Clinic aims to provide free culturally and linguistically appropriate health care services to the Hmong community. They provide chronic disease management and screenings for cancer: breast, cervical, colon and prostate cancer, in addition to Hepatitis B. Their next application cycle will open in Summer 2017.

Shifa Clinic
Shifa Clinic strives to understand, serve, and promote the health and wellness needs of a multilingual, ethnically diverse community. It primarily serve patients from the South Asian and Muslim communities. It provides interpretive services and hosts specialty clinics such as dermatology, cardiology, women’s health and pediatrics. Their next application cycle will open in Spring 2017.

The Willow Clinic
The Willow Clinic primarily serves the homeless population in Sacramento. Willow Clinic has a well-established dental and pharmacy program. In addition, they host Wellness Nights on Fridays where students can make crafts, do yoga, or sing karaoke with patients. Their next application cycle will open in Spring 2017.

Victoria Nugent
4th year, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior Major
Sociology Minor
BASC Peer Advisor


 

 

 

 

 

Resources for Pre-Health Students

Are you interested in medicine but do not want to take the long path and 663go through medical school to reach your dreams? Have no fear, the medical field is extremely broad and you can still have a career within the health field without having to go to medical school. Pretty exciting right? Without further ado, let us talk about some of the resources UC Davis offers if you are considering a health profession.

One of the resources you should visit would be Health Professions Advising (HPA). Joanne Snapp, the Director of Health Professions Advising, has many resources about different health professions. Some of these professions may include Dentistry, Nursing, Physicians Assistant, Occupational Therapy, Veterinary Medicine, Clinical Lab Specialist, Genetic Counseling, and many more. Joanne Snapp also has many workshops that are geared towards specific professions as well as general workshops for anyone interested in health professions. She also lists out required and recommended courses, success stories, process of applying/interviewing, and information about different schools. All this information is accessible on the HPA website where a student is also able to schedule an appointment.

Another helpful resource that is available to you is the Internship and Career Center (ICC). If you are interestedcommunity_outreach in health professions, the best way to “try out” the career is through an internship. This way you would be able to experience the daily life of that profession and see if that is something you would enjoy doing for the rest of your life. Speaking from experience, internships were the key elements that guided me to my current career path. I have participated in multiple internships where I was able to gain hands-on-experience that I would have never learned from a textbook.

In October, UC Davis co-sponsors The Annual UC Davis Pre-Medical and Pre-Health Professions National Conference, which is a great resource to gain knowledge on different health professions. This is the largest pre-medical and pre-health conference in the nation and it is a completely student run organization. This year around 2,000 speakers will be attending from various schools and programs such as Pharmacy, Nursing, Public Health, Podiatric Medicine, and many more. The conference offers more than 350 workshops where you are able to gain insight and engage with speakers on a more personal level. I would highly recommend attending this conference, as it will expand your knowledge and allow you to get a wider understanding of the various health professions available.

The UC Davis Study Abroad is another useful resource because they have medical-internglobal health internships. Their internships are across the global and some of the locations may include: Bolivia, South Africa, India, Peru, and many more. This is great opportunity because you are able to travel as well as gain hands-on-experience in diverse locations, which is great because when the student comes back to the United States they have a new health perspective as well as increased cultural-sensitivity.

The last valuable resource is health professions student organizations. UC Davis offers hundreds of different student organizations and these organizations help you get involved. By getting involved, you surround yourself with other students who have similar career goals and they are able to give you tips and encouragement along this career journey.

As you can see, UC Davis highly values pre-health students and wants to offer many ways for students to find their own success as a health professional. Most of these resources are free of charge so make sure you take advantage of these wonderful opportunities while you still have the chance!

Rufa Pazyuk
BASC Peer Adviser
Second Year, Biological Sciences Major

Career Spotlight: Physician Assistant

Are you interested in the field of medicine but are not entirely interested in becoming a physician? Becoming a Physician Assistant (PA) can be a great alternative. A licensed PA works alongside a Physician, gets one on one interaction with patients, can prescribe medication in all 50 states plus the District of Columbia, and many other responsibilities are plausible; such as diagnosing illness and disease, performing or assisting in surgeries, or instructing and counseling patients.

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Physician Assistant examining a patient. Source: ExploreHealthCareers.org

Schooling to become a PA varies from 2-6 years. A master’s degree from an accredited educational program is needed, which usually takes two years as a full-time student to complete. Before applying to a program most students have prior experience as Registered Nurses or Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) and Paramedics (to satisfy the 1,000 hour requirement of clinical experience). Students must also take prerequisite courses in order to be accepted into the Master’s program. The prerequisite courses for UC Davis, taken from the School of Nursing website, are as follows:

  • One course in human anatomy with lab
  • One course in human physiology with lab
  • Or human anatomy and physiology series: Part I and Part II with lab
  • One course in general chemistry with lab
  • One course in microbiology or bacteriology with lab
  • One course in algebra, calculus or statistics (basic or advanced)
  • One course in English composition
  • Two courses in social sciences.

Prerequisite courses may vary for each institution, so it is a good idea to be familiar with the prerequisites for the school(s) of your choice.

To become licensed, one must take the Physician Assistant National Certifying Examination (PANCE). Certification must be maintained by continuing education every two years. For more information on the certification process you can refer to Certification Process below.

Employment in this field is expected to grow 38% from 2012 to 2022, according to the Occupational Outlook Handbook for PA. This is due to the increase in the aging population, largely contributed by the baby boom generation. The increase in several chronic diseases is also playing a role in higher demand for Physician Assistants.

If you are interested in learning more about this career, take a look at the Career and Professional Association Resources listed below. You can also find information about graduate programs offered for Physician Assistants at UC Davis here: UC Davis Graduate Programs-Physician Assistant.

QUICK STATS:

Entry-Level Education:

  • Master’s degree for entry-level positions
  • PhD is not necessary

UC Davis majors which may be of interest but are not required:

  • Biological Sciences
  • Genetics
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology
  • Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior
  • Microbiology

UC Davis minors which may be of interest but are not required:

  • Biological Sciences
  • Exercise Biology
  • Human Development
  • Human Physiology
  • Neuroscience

Median Pay (as of 2012):

According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook for PA:

$90,930 per year
$43.72 per hour

Job outlook (The projected percent change in employment from 2012 to 2022. The average growth rate for all occupations is 11 percent.):

According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook for PA: 38%

Career and Professional Association Resources:

BLS.gov– Occupational Outlook Handbook for Physician Assistants
UC Davis Internship and Career Center
Certification Process
Explore HealthCareers.org
Master of Health Sciences -The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing

Benefits of an Internship

Have you been thIntern-1inking about joining an internship? What are you waiting for? UC Davis offers many internships (i.e. business, design, health, government, law, etc.) so there is always something for everyone. However, if you are interested in an internship that we do not offer, the staff at the Internship and Career Center (ICC) will try their best to get you an internship you like. Some ask “will an internship be worth my time”? To make life easier, I listed four reasons (even though there are many more) why internships are beneficial and why you should participate in an internship!

First: The Experience! Wouldn’t  it be nice to have an inside look into your future career before fully committing to that career? Internships help you find the right career fit, and allow you to test drive before investing your time and money into a career you may not even enjoy. For example, let’s say you want to become a physician. If you do an internship at a hospital or clinic, you will be able to observe and work alongside a physician, which allows to you see an in-depth look of what really goes on outside of the classroom.

Second: Networking!  Internships provide network opportunities. You get the opportunity to form close bonds between your colleagues and superunrvisors, who can eventually become your mentors or write you letters of recommendation. Because of this networking opportunity, the supervisor is more likely to hire you versus someone they have never met. The internship will also look great on your application because it will show that you have experience and are therefore highly qualified for the position.

Third: Develop New Skills! Everyone can benefit from building new skills. Internships teach you many things, not only in and outs of the company you are interning for but also personal skills such as better communication, working in a team, or building empathy. Also, internships let you sharpen the skills you already have and you are able to put all that academic knowledge you learned over the years to use.

Fourth: Earn Course Credits and/or Transcript Notation! Yes, you heard right, not only do you get to earn experience, opportunities and new skills from internships but you may also earn UNITS and the internship appears on your transcript. It is a win-win for everyone. Many students take advantage of this opportunity during the summer because to be considered a full-time student and to be qualified for financial aid a student must be enrolled in a minimum of six units.

I have been involved in many internships and can say that I learned something from each one. Each internship was a wonderful experience that provided a different view on my future career. Through the internships, I learned what I am passionate about as well as things that I knew were not a right fit for me. Remember if you are applying to an internship you have to start the process the quarter before you get involved. Step out of your comfort zone and get involved as soon as you can! What are you waiting for? Visit the Internship and Career Center in South Hall or check out their website: icc.ucdavis.edu

Rufa Pazyuk
BASC Peer Adviser
Second Year, Biological Sciences

Finding a Balance

It’s not uncommon for me to have a date with Peter J. Shields that lasts five hours. Sometimes during midterm weeks, we go on many dates. Do we get tired of each other? Of course we do. However, our relationship is important. Without the countless hours I have spent at our campus library, my knowledge and my grades would be suffering.

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To ensure that I maintain a strong relationship with Peter J. Shields, I have learned to balance my schoolwork with extracurricular activities. It is important to avoid overwhelming yourself in schoolwork to the point that you no longer find your courses rewarding. Instead, find opportunities to get involved in clubs and activities that give your eyes a break from studying.

When I’m not at Peter J. Shields, I’m at the ARC playing intramural sports or listening to guest speakers at Pre-Dental Society meetings. There are hundreds of extracurricular activities at UC Davis. I’ve decided to highlight a few opportunities that may interest students in the College of Biological Sciences (CBS).

1. Interested in a volunteering abroad? There are multiple groups on campus dedicated to improving health in impoverished countries. I recently traveled to Liberia, Costa Rica with Spreading Smiles, a student-run organization unique to UC Davis. In Liberia, we traveled to churches, promoting oral hygiene techniques and providing non-invasive dental cleanings. Through out the school year, we fundraise through car washes and bake sales. Check out other awesome volunteering groups such as Project Rishi, Global Medical Brigades, and Global Dental Brigades.

2. Interested in getting to know your classmates outside of lecture? Join a club related to your major! It’s awesome surrounding yourself with people of similar interests and career paths. Our very own peer adviser, Wilson, is a member of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) at UC Davis. ASM organizes guest speakers, field trips, and other group activities relevant to microbiology. There are other major clubs for CBS students such as the EXB Club, NPB Club, Bio Boosters (a great opportunity for biology majors), Genetics Club, and MCB Club.

3. Interested in applying your scientific knowledge to broader societal issues? Join the Environmental Science and Policy Club at UC Davis. This club gives CBS students the opportunity to diversify their knowledge through exposing members to topics related to social sciences and politics. If environmental issues are not your strongest interest, browse other clubs like Student Reproductive Coalition, Universities Allied for Essential Medicine, and Team HBV.

4. Interested in applying your scientific knowledge to something revolutionary? Explore the numerous undergraduate research opportunities available at UC Davis. Research gives students hands-on scientific experience and helps students develop relationships with renowned faculty members.

Becoming involved in extracurricular activities helps you meet new people, diversify your knowledge and experiences, and strengthen your resume. While I’ve only highlighted a select few of the extracurricular activities available at UC Davis, check out the Center for Student Involvement webpage to find an activity that fits you!

Jennifer Hofmann

Senior

Exercise Biology

BASC Peer Adviser